Playing with line and shadow

Could it be more black and white? This sign at Te Papa Tongarewa, Museum of New Zealand repeats the words of a World War I recruiting poster.

Could it be more black and white? This sign at Te Papa Tongarewa, Museum of New Zealand repeats the words of a World War I recruiting poster. Photo: Su Leslie, 2014. Shot with iPhone4, colour-edited with Pixlr Express.

Amongst the visual arts, sculpture is one of my favourites. I also love the interface between two and three dimensional art. The piece above sits high above an exhibition space at Te Papa Museum of New Zealand in Wellington. The words are from a World War I recruiting poster. At the time, New Zealand was a British Dominion and was swift to follow Britain in declaring war on Germany and its allies. Almost ten percent of New Zealand’s population served in that war, and this tiny country of around one million souls suffered a casualty rate of 58 percent – amongst the highest of any nation in the conflict.

wire2

Coiled wire sculpture fixed to a white wall. Photo: Su Leslie, 2014. Shot with iPhone4, colour-edited with Pixlr Express.

With some embarrassment I admit that when I took these shots, I didn’t note down the name of the artist, or the work – something I feel quite bad about as I know how important it is to acknowledge the creativity of artists.

I loved these two pieces; elaborate coils of wire attached to a white wall. As the light changed throughout the day, visitors experienced different patterns – and indeed different sculptures.

wire 1

Coiled wire sculpture fixed to a white wall. Photo: Su Leslie, 2014. Shot with iPhone4, colour-edited with Pixlr Express.

dowse

Kerrie Poliness, ‘Black O’. Installation at the Dowse Art Museum in Lower Hutt. Photo: Su Leslie, 2013. Shot with iPhone4, colour-edited with Pixlr Express.

Kerrie Poliness is a Melbourne-based artist. This installation at the Dowse Art Museum, Lower Hutt, NZ consists of lines drawn directly onto the walls with black marker pen – creating the illusion of three-dimensionality.

This week at Lens and Pens by Sally, the challenge theme is black and white. You can join in here.

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23 thoughts on “Playing with line and shadow

    • Thanks; I loved them too. I saw them at the Botanic Gardens in Auckland. There was a big outdoor sculpture show and an indoor gallery space with smaller work. I’m kicking myself that I didn’t take a picture of the exhibit card so I’d know who the artist was!

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  1. I’m also a devotee of sculpture, and it’s a pleasure to view those artworks that you select. The first one is layered in meaning and is my favorite. Your descriptions add to the enjoyment of all your images work well in monochrome. Happy Photo Challenge.

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  2. Pingback: Phoneography and Non-SLR Digital Photo Challenge: Black and White (Longwood Gardens) | Lens and Pens by Sally

    • Hi Janet. I love them too; I so wish I could find out whose work they are. I hate the idea of the artist not being acknowledged. I’ll have to call the gallery or it will drive me crazy ๐Ÿ™‚

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    • I had to double check them! I knew that we had suffered disproportionately, but the actual numbers were worse than I had thought. WWI – and in particular the Gallipoli campaign – has probably been the most significant thing shaping our national identity. ๐Ÿ™‚

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  3. very cool shadow captures – and I like the art and history tidbits.

    also – the sign to recruit for the war – well it could also be a sign for a ladies online dating mantra – ha ha

    have a great day Su

    Liked by 1 person

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