Muriwai; looking south from Gannet colony lookout. Photo: Su Leslie, 2014. Shot with iPhone4. Framed/edited with Pixlr Express.

Muriwai; looking south from the gannet colony lookout. Photo: Su Leslie, 2014. Shot with iPhone4. Framed/edited with Pixlr Express.

As I’m sure I’ve mentioned (at least 100 times) that life is really hectic at the moment. My role with NZ Sculpture OnShore has become all-consuming, the boy-child has exams looming, and of course we’re starting to think about life-after-exhibition-and-school —Β  in particular selling the house and moving on.

Yesterday it all got a bit too much. Not so much the volume of work, but the politics of a voluntary organisation exacerbated by the stress that everyone is under. So I ran away!

Does that make me sound like a quitter? A bad person? To clarify — I ran away for the afternoon. Away from my desk and email and the telephone, to Muriwai, on Auckland’s west coast. I had set out to visit Boric Food Market for some last-minute dinner ingredients but somehow just kept driving.

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Down the hill, turn the corner, and this is the view of Muriwai. Photo: Su Leslie, 2014. Shot with iPhone4. Framed/edited with Pixlr Express.

Muriwai is the first west-coast beach I ever visited. I was about nine, and on a school trip. I was enchanted — I still am. Not being a particularly strong swimmer, I prefer more sheltered beaches for taking a dip, but for a lung-filling walk to clear the cerebral cobwebs, the beaches of New Zealand’s west coast are hard to beat.

Looking north up Muriwai Beach.

Looking north up Muriwai Beach. Photo: Su Leslie, 2014. Shot with iPhone4. Framed/edited with Pixlr Express.

One of the first dates the Big T and I ever went on was to Muriwai. We sat on the cliff at Maori Bay, drank Guinness and listened to Luke Hurley. Unsurprisingly, his song Japanese Overdrive is one of my all-time favourites.

Out to sea from Maori Bay, Muriwai. Photo: Su Leslie, 2014. Shot with iPhone4. Framed/edited with Pixlr Express.

Out to sea from Maori Bay, Muriwai. Photo: Su Leslie, 2014. Shot with iPhone4. Framed/edited with Pixlr Express.

The gannet colony, Muriwai. Photo: Su Leslie, 2014. Shot with iPhone4. Framed/edited with Pixlr Express.

The gannet colony, Muriwai. Photo: Su Leslie, 2014. Shot with iPhone4. Framed/edited with Pixlr Express.

I wasn’t gone for long, and I even remembered to drop into Boric. Afterwards I felt better able to cope. Muriwai does that for me.

This post was written for Sally’s Phoneography and Non-SLR Digital Photo Challenge at Lens and Pens by Sally. You can join in here.

 

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Nature’s healing touch

25 thoughts on “Nature’s healing touch

  1. I love west coast beaches, too. I haven’t been to Muriwai. My favourite west coast beach is Himitangi, most Kiwis have never heard of it. It’s wild, invigorating and, for me restorative, like Muriwai is for you. Beautiful beach, beautiful photos.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks Jill. I hadn’t heard of Himitangi, but thanks to Google maps I now know it is quite near where my dad lives. Methinks a road trip over the summer when I’ve got my life back ….. Thanks for stopping by and introducing me to this great-looking beach. πŸ™‚

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  2. Pingback: Phoneography and Non-SLR Digital Photo Challenge: Nature (Her Softer Palette) | Lens and Pens by Sally

  3. Well-deserved break after having such a hectic schedule dear Su.Indeed Nature is the best healer and being away from it for a long time does affect our body and mind.I like your approach to the issue through those wonderful seascapes ! I rest my eyes on the blue of the vast ocean while I am listening to the Japanese Overdrive.
    Take good care , love ~β™₯~β™₯~β™₯~ and kisses πŸ™‚

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