Lang Ea, 'Listen', 2014. Exhibited at NZ Sculpture OnShore. Photo: Su Leslie, 2014

Lang Ea, Listen, 2014. Exhibited at NZ Sculpture OnShore. Photo: Su Leslie, 2014

Piled in the entryway of an underground tunnel at a historic military site; Lang Ea’s cement heads – eyes closed, without ears – were for me the most powerful work at NZ Sculpture OnShore. Lang Ea came to New Zealand from Cambodia as a child, and this work, ‘Listen’ resonates with the imagery of Cambodia’s brutal Khmer past.

On the other side of a small glade, in another underground room, Sam Harrison’s ‘Gretchen’ย  leans against a wall. Exhibited at an event which raises funds for Women’s Refuge, this work inevitably suggest a strong emotional response, yet many visitors have been moved by the simple beauty of her form.

Sam Harrison, 'Gretchen', 2014. Exhibited at NZ Sculpture OnShore. Photo: Su Leslie, 2014.

Sam Harrison, Gretchen, 2014. Exhibited at NZ Sculpture OnShore. Photo: Su Leslie, 2014.

Detail of Ramon Robertson's 'Only in the World' 2014. Exhibited at NZ Sculpture OnShore. Photo: Su Leslie, 2014

Detail of Ramon Robertson’s Only in the World 2014. Background scuplture, Jamie Pickenell, Beach Master, 2014. Exhibited at NZ Sculpture OnShore. Photo: Su Leslie, 2014

Ramon Robertson is a Scottish artist now living in New Zealand. His work often features plaster and concrete figures – apparently mass produced, yet somehow unique. The title of this work comes from French phenomenologist Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s statement “only in the context of the world we inhabit do we know who we are and what our purpose is.”

Detail of Anna Korver's The Three Sisters, 2014. Exhibited at NZ Sculpture OnShore. Photo: Su Leslie, 2014

Detail of Anna Korver’s The Three Sisters, 2014. Exhibited at NZ Sculpture OnShore. Photo: Su Leslie, 2014

In contrast to the human forms depicted in the other artists’ work, Taranaki-based sculptor Anna Korver allows the garment to represent the form. She has developed a considerable body of work based on “the dress.” This piece in basalt is one of three that was exhibited at NZ Sculpture OnShore.

This post was written as part of Sally’s Phoneography and non SLR Digital Photo Challenge at Lens and Pens by Sally. This week the theme is black and white.

 

 

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Body-subject, body-object: pictures from an exhibition #3

15 thoughts on “Body-subject, body-object: pictures from an exhibition #3

    • Hi Julie; thanks. I volunteered to help at the 2012 exhibition to help a friend out. I originally thought I’d just spend a few hours, but it was obvious that more was needed so I ended up working for most of the duration of the 10 day exhibition. After that I was asked to join the fund-raising body as a trustee. Then a vacancy came up on the board of the company set up to run the event and I joined that too. I’ve become the (pro bono) marketing and communications person — which is one of the reasons I write about the event so much. As a fund-raising event, we do everything on a shoestring and social media is a very affordable way of promoting the event. Cheers, Su.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. This has been a wonderful exhibitio, Su – and you must’ve been tickled pink to be involved (even it it did cause angst beforehand). I say, lucky you ! ๐Ÿ˜€

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