Wordless Wednesday: let the sunshine in

Morning walk in Wainoni Park, Greenhithe, NZ. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

Morning walk in Wainoni Park, Greenhithe, NZ. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

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Morning walk in Wainoni Park, Greenhithe, NZ. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

Let the Sunshine In is a song from the brilliant 1967 anti-war musical Hair. Protest from a more innocent age?

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17 thoughts on “Wordless Wednesday: let the sunshine in

    • Yeah, I guess with less covert opposition from the media, etc. it probably made more sense to believe in change. My introduction to large-scale protest was the 1981 Springbok Tour of NZ. It divided the country, and although the tour went ahead and we felt pretty demoralised a lot of the time, it turned the world’s attention on our little country and I’ve learned from friends overseas that their “geography” of this country is partly shaped by the sites of protest. I guess I’m getting old and cynical; I feel so much less optimistic of change these days.

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  1. NZ was put on the map for me with the Rainbow Warrior. I’m also less optimistic as the US starts up its run for the presidency in 2016. All controlled by big money and connections, yet if people bothered to turn out and vote….

    But love you photographs!!

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    • The Rainbow Warrior tragedy changed a lot of people’s attitudes in NZ and certainly helped the Nuclear-free NZ movement. I remember most of that decade as one of real optimism. We went from the challenge of the Springbok tour in ’81, to the success of the Homosexual Law Reform Act in ’86 and of course Nuclear-free in ’87. Co-incidentally, I was a student during those years. I think it started to turn to custard about the time I got a job!

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    • I usually hate musicals, but I loved Hair — probably because I remember when it came out and all the adults were totally scandalised by it. I was about seven and was dying to know what all the fuss was about. I saw the film when I was a student and wept absolute buckets. Love all the songs and still sing them (though I suspect I’ve misheard some of the lyrics and got them all terribly wrong). I’ve never seen JC-Superstar, though I know the music. Our primary school did an appalling version of Joseph and his flash coat-thingy (minus the seduction scene with Potiphar’s wife). Andrew Lloyd Webber has a lot to answer for 🙂

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