Six word Saturday: … shout to the blue summer sky

Layers of image; my phone wallpaper seen through a faceted glass. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

Strange workings of my mind; distorted images of long-past days bring memories of songs from even longer aro. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

The title of the post comes from the song Throw Your Arms Around Me, by Australian band Hunters and Collectors.

 

 

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Daily Post Photo Challenge: “… a good day ain’t got no rain”

I have probably said it before, but I am a “glass half empty” person. In truth I usually feel that my glass is three-quarters empty — but that doesn’t make much sense as a pithy observation.

I have a profound capacity to see and dwell upon anything negative in a situation, even whilst those around me experience great joy. The best I can say about this is that I’ve gradually learned to keep my mouth shut (usually), so I don’t spoil others’ pleasure.

The American musician and comic Oscar Levant said that happiness isn’t something you experience, but something you remember. While I subscribe wholeheartedly to that view, I often struggle to even remember happiness, such is my Eeyore-like nature.

So my personal challenge for this week’s Daily Post’s Weekly Photo Challenge has been to bring together the things that make for a good day; those things that get me out of bed and willing to try on a happy face.

In choosing these images I am paying tribute to the scenes, moments, rituals, and above all people, whose presence contribute to a good day — if only I let myself see it.

The title for the post comes from Paul Simon’s Slip Slidin’ Away. I could be the woman, but am trying to choose not to be.

I know a woman
Became a wife
These are the very words she uses
To describe her life
She said a good day
Ain’t got no rain
She said a bad day’s when I lie in bed
And think of things that might have been
Slip slidin’ away
Slip slidin’ away
You know the nearer your destination
The more you’re slip slidin’ away

Paul Simon, Slip Slidin’ Away

On enjoying the art of light

Shima for Wellington, performed by Anna Kuroda, of Murasaki Penguin. Wellington LUX, 2015. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

‘Shima for Wellington’, performed by Anna Kuroda, of Murasaki Penguin. Wellington LUX, 2015. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

Combining travel with art is my idea of bliss, so it’s fair to say that last weekend — spent in one of my favourite cities which happened to be hosting a light festival — was a pretty blissed-out experience.

Wellington LUX is a festival of light sculpture; clever, high-tech, whimsical and just plain gorgeous. By its nature, it’s a night-time event, so my photos are a bit wobbly, but I think they give a sense of the magic wrought by some very talented artists and designers with that most primal of materials — light.

Feed the Kids Too [Capital], Turtle Donna Sarten and Bernie Harfleet, Wellington LUX, 2015. Photo; Su Leslie, 2015

Feed the Kids Too [Capital]’, Turtle Donna Sarten and Bernie Harfleet, Wellington LUX, 2015. Photo; Su Leslie, 2015

Auckland artists Turtle Donna Sarten and Bernie Harfleet installed their ‘Feed the Kids Too‘ work, first seen at NZ Sculpture OnShore last year. Consisting of 1800 empty plastic lunchboxes, this incredibly popular and powerful work reminds us how many children in New Zealand go to school hungry each day. After last year’s Sculpture OnShore, the lunchboxes (6000 of them then) were cleaned, filled with food and distributed to Auckland children. This time the artists have arranged with the Wellington City Mission to fill and distribute the boxes to local children who might otherwise go hungry.

Children + glow in the dark chalk = happiness. Wellington LUX, 2015. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

Children + glow in the dark chalk = happiness. Wellington LUX, 2015. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

Simon Burgin, "Gust". Wellington LUX, 2015. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015,

Simon Burgin, ‘Gust‘. Wellington LUX, 2015. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015.

Detail of "Gust", by Simon Burgin. Wellington LUX, 2015. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

Detail of ‘Gust‘, by Simon Burgin. Wellington LUX, 2015. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

Playing on Wellington’s notoriety as a very windy city, ‘Gust‘ projects images of its audience interacting with an imaginary wind – represented by geometric shapes.

30Forward; a video by Footnote New Zealand Dance, projected on waterscreen. Wellington LUX, 2015. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

30Forward; a video by Footnote New Zealand Dance, projected on waterscreen. Wellington LUX, 2015. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

30Forward comprised a performance video of dance company Footnote New Zealand. Projected on a water-screen in the harbour, this installation was incredibly popular — even when the wind blew spray all over the audience!

In order for the light to shine so brightly, the darkness must be present.

— Francis Bacon

Art can be a light shone on life, society, ideas; an illumination of the mind. In the case of LUX, Francis Bacon is doubly right.

This post was written for Sally D’s Mobile Photography Challenge at Lens and Pens by Sally.

Service disruption: when WordPress and my iPad stop talking to each other

Wellington waterfront, from Te Papa Tongarewa Museum of New Zealand. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

Wellington waterfront, from Te Papa Tongarewa Museum of New Zealand. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

I spent the weekend in Wellington, visiting friends, exhibitions and Wellington LUX – a light festival installed along the city’s waterfront. I had intended to write the a few blog posts while I was away, but my iPad decided otherwise. I suspect that the version of iOS I’m running isn’t compatible with the version of WordPress, so while I can eventually access the Reader (after clicking through half a dozen error messages); I can no longer post anything. OK for now, but I’ll have to address the problem before I go to Sculpture by the Sea in Sydney at the end of October.

LUX was wonderful — and definitely worth a separate post — but here is a shot from the installation Shima for Wellington by Murasaki Penguin — a collaborative project between Japanese dancer and choreographer Anna Kuroda and Australian artist David Kirkpatrick.

Murasaki Penguin, 'Shima for Wellington', Wellington LUX, 2015 . Photo: Su Leslie, 2015.

Murasaki Penguin, ‘Shima for Wellington’, Wellington LUX, 2015 . Photo: Su Leslie, 2015.

 

 

 

Daily Post Photo Challenge: “between the mountains of safety and danger …”

At first glance, an eye, or just a drop of water? Photo: Su Leslie, 2014

At first glance, an alien eye, or trees reflected in a drop of water? Photo: Su Leslie, 2014

Michael Stevens (Vsauce) in his video Why are things Creepy? suggests that:

Creepy things are kind of an ambiguity but they’re also kind of not, so our brains don’t know what to do. Some parts respond with fear, while other parts don’t, and they don’t know why. So instead of achieving a typical fear response – horror – we simply feel uneasy. Terror. Creeped out. Between the mountains of safety and danger there is a valley of creepiness, where the limits of our trust and knowledge and security aren’t very clear.

I like this; particularly the emphasis on ambiguity. English is a language so rich it’s not always easy to separate out clear definitions and uses for its many synonymous words. “Terror”. “Horror”. “Fear”. “The creeps.” We know they are different, but knowing how and why is tricky.

I find the image above slightly creepy. Is it an eye? Or just a drop of water. In my imagination it could easily be the chrysallis of an alien life, beginning its transformation.

Creepy-ness is a quality particularly suited to photography and film-making, where manipulation of images is a legitimate part of the magic.

A couple of years ago I photographed some ceramic heads mounted in a tree at a sculpture exhibition. At the time I found them slightly disturbing, but in the light of day, I could see where the heads were mounted on the tree, so there was no real ambiguity — it was a piece of sculpture.

But with a bit of photo editing  — to “hide the joins” — I think the image takes on a slightly ambiguous quality.

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Markiska de Jaeger, ‘Four Seasons’. Seen at Kaipara Sculpture Park and Gardens. Photo: Su Leslie, 2013. Edited with Snapseed.

Some things are culturally imbued with a much greater “creepy” factor than others; like insects, which are often called “creepy-crawlies.” What is it about something so small that makes us so uneasy?

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Cicada on the windowsill. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015. Edited with Snapseed.

And do we feel better or worse when the image is transformed a bit so it appear the insect lies beneath a layer of … what?

Double exposure: cicada trapped under glass bubble. Photos: Su Leslie, 2014 and 2015. Edited with Snapseed.

Double exposure: cicada under glass bubble. Photos: Su Leslie, 2014 and 2015. Edited with Snapseed.

This post was written for the Daily Post Weekly Photo Challenge. This week’s theme is “creepy.”

 

 

Wordless Wednesday: a few slices of cheddar short of a ploughman’s

Marathon onion-pickling session done. Now I just have to wait until they're ready! Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

Marathon onion-pickling session done. Now I just have to wait until they’re ready! Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

I’m getting the hang of this domestic goddess lark. Have spent the last few days making pickled onions and more sourdough bread. Now we just have to dust off the Big T’s cheese-making kit and we’ll be on the way to a decent home-made ploughman’s lunch.

The sour-dough is coming along. First attempt at a white loaf. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

The sour-dough is coming along. First attempt at a white loaf. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

But I guess we might have to start a micro-brewery too.

If I just lay here ….

Sunset, Puniawia, Tahiti. Photo: Su Leslie, 2010

Cocktails at sunset, Puna’auia,Tahiti. Photo: Su Leslie, 2010

Mellow is a not a word that I’d use to describe myself. Even on the most peaceful tropical holiday, I’m the photographer — always on the move — rather than the one relaxing by the lagoon. Perhaps I should take lessons from my cat.

As mellow as it gets. My fur baby on her favourite rug. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

As mellow as it gets. My fur baby on her favourite rug. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

Or listen to more music. The title of this post comes from the song Chasing Cars by Snow Patrol.

This week’s Travel Theme at Where’s My Backpack is mellow. You can see Ailsa’s photos here.

Politics and protest: not really black and white

The face of peaceful protest to protect New Zealand's economy, environment and way of life. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

The face of peaceful protest to protect New Zealand’s economy, environment and way of life. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

I don’t often photograph people, but did feel compelled to document last weekend’s protests against our government’s secret negotiation of TPPA (Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement).

Shoulder to shoulder. Protesters on Auckland's Queen Street. #TPPA protest. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

Shoulder to shoulder. Protesters on Auckland’s Queen Street. #TPPA protest. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

For some time now, New Zealanders have been voicing concern about the possible impacts of such an agreement on our health system, environment, economy and indeed our sovereignty. There is also very real concern that the whole negotiation process is being carried out in secret. Effectively we’re being asked to sign up to a wide-ranging and long-term agreement sight unseen.

Thousands gathered in Aotea Square, Auckland, to protest @TPPA. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

Thousands gathered in Aotea Square, Auckland, to protest @TPPA. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

Despite wide-ranging concerns, the mainstream media has consistently underplayed and ignored the issue. For that reason, it is important that ordinary people document the protests which were held in towns across New Zealand. These attracted many thousands of people of all ages, backgrounds and socio-economic group.

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#TPPA protesters on Auckland’s Queen Street. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

A face in the crowd. #TPPA protest, Auckland, New Zealand. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

A face in the crowd. #TPPA protest, Auckland, New Zealand. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

Protesters; march against secret negotiations of #TPPA, Auckland, NZ. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

Protesters; march against secret negotiations of #TPPA, Auckland, NZ. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

This post was written for Sally D’s Mobile Photography Challenge at Lens and Pens by Sally.

 

Six word Saturday: thousands marched in protest today #TPPAWalkAway

#TPPAWalkAway. Thousands of Aucklanders take to the streets to protest the secret TPPA negotiations. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

#TPPAWalkAway. Thousands of Aucklanders gather in Aotea Square to protest the secrecy surrounding the government negotiating the proposed Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

Getting ready to march. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

Getting ready to march. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

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Stretching down Queen Street; anti TPPA protest in Auckland. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

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#TPPAWalkAway. Thousands of protesters around New Zealand urged the government to reconsider the highly secret TPPA negotiations. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

What is TPPA (The Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement)?