Like Sally and Raewyn (decocraftsdigicrafts),  I’m using this last post of the year to Sally D’s Mobile Photography Challenge  to look back at some of the images I’ve shared in 2015.

There are definite themes that emerge; my growing fascination with the minutiae of the natural world, my frustration with neo-liberal political and economic systems that devalue both human life and the earth upon which we depend, and a growing interest in the interplay between memory and image. And of course art; particularly sculpture. This last has also provided an excuse to indulge in another love — travel — taking me to Wellington for LUX Festival of Light, Gibbs Farm on the Kaipara, and Sydney for the Sculpture by the Sea exhibition at Bondi.

 

Visitors to Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi, NSW, Australia pose by Norton Flavell's sculpture 'Dust.' Image: Su Leslie, 2015

How to experience art in the twenty first century. Artwork: ‘Dust’ by Norton Flavell. Image: Su Leslie, 2015

At Bondi, I noticed an alarming number of visitors treating works of art as little more than backdrop for selfies; this became the basis of my post Putting yourself in the picture: how to experience art in the 21st century.

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Bernar Venet, ‘88.5 ARC x 8. Gibbs Farm Sculpture Park, Kaipara Harbour, NZ. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

A rainy day visit to the monumental sculptures at Gibbs Farm left me feeling renewed and awed at the juxtaposition of art and landscape (Art in the Outdoors: a vigorous antidote to melancholy)

Art installation, "Feed the Kids Too [Capital]", Turtle Donna Sarten and Bernie Harfleet, Wellington LUX, 2015. Photo; Su Leslie, 2015

Feed the Kids Too [Capital], Turtle Donna Sarten and Bernie Harfleet, Wellington LUX, 2015. Photo; Su Leslie, 2015

My friends Turtle Donna Sarten and Bernie Harfleet took their beautiful and thought-provoking work Feed the Kids Too to Wellington’s LUX Festival where it proved once again to be a hit with visitors.

"All that is solid melts into air" graffitti on old pipes lying alongside the River Thames, London. Black and white photo by Su Leslie, 2015.

Riverside, Greenwich, London. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

Marx’s “all that is solid melts into air” graffiti’d onto rusting pipes beside London’s Thames provoked a piece on urbanisation and unchecked growth — a theme I had already visited in an earlier challenge — On the Half-Gallon, Quarter-Acre Pavlova Paradise.

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High density housing on the city fringes. Far from the “Kiwi quarter acre” and beyond the means of many. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015.

Politics was never far from my thoughts in 2015, as the Big T and I joined many thousands of people around the world protesting at the proposed TPPA agreement.

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The face of peaceful protest to protect New Zealand’s economy, environment and way of life. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

 

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Enjoying the beauty of age. Image: Su Leslie, 2015

Photo-editing as a tool to explore the relationships between image, emotion and memory became increasingly important to me, as I began to focus on the natural world and my place in it.

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Agapanthus. Photo: Su Leslie, 2014. Edited with Snapseed.

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Money tree blossom. Image: Su Leslie, 2015

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Autumn. Photo: Su Leslie 2015.

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Surprisingly warm for the time of year; the boy-child testing the water. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

And sometimes I managed not to over-think and seek deeper meaning. Sometimes, I was able just to enjoy the moment and the images that captured that moment — particularly when it meant spending time with my son.

To Sally, many thanks for hosting this challenge. Thanks too to everyone who takes part and makes the experience so interesting, sociable and rewarding.

Wishing you all a very happy new year.

ngā mihi o te tau hou

 

Sally D’s Mobile Photography Challenge: looking back on the year

19 thoughts on “Sally D’s Mobile Photography Challenge: looking back on the year

  1. We wish you a Happy New Year Sue. Would you do a favour for me? A 12 year old, black boy was murdered by police in the US. The prosecutor let the policeofficer who did this off. These racial killings are never going to stop unless the world tells them that their justice system is a sham. The Cuyahoga County Prosecutor, Timothy McGinty was the one who did this. They have a website and contact information if you google Cuyahoga County Prosecutor. Would you consider sending them an email letting them know that the world is watching them. This is the email that I sent them:
    Mr. McGinty, how can you justify what just happened in regards to a 12 year old boy, Tamir Rice? The world is looking and it is horrified at this injustice. Until justice prevails it will happen again and again. This is just wrong and deep in your heart you must know this.
    Leslie Martel
    Canada

    Like

  2. Su, I thoroughly enjoyed your reflection on the past year–a year where you certainly experimented with the creative process and moved closer to your muses. My best to you and yours in the year ahead. It’s a joy to have you as part of the challenge’s community. Happy Photo Challenge.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Pingback: Sally D’s Mobile Photography Challenge: Challenger’s Choice (2015 and Self-Evaluation) | Lens and Pens by Sally

  4. Pingback: My iPhotography Year In Review | Light Words

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