Halved tomatoes, green chilli and garlic, salt and olive oil, ready for slow-roasting. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

Vine to roasting dish; five minutes. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

At the moment we’re harvesting too many tomatoes to eat fresh, so I decided to slow-roast some with green chillis (also from the garden) and garlic (bought, but grown locally).

Slow-roasted tomatoes. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

Slow-roasted tomatoes. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

The result was delicious with zucchini noodles and a few toasted pinenuts. I would have taken a photo of the finished dish, but I really was hungry.

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Luscious #2

21 thoughts on “Luscious #2

  1. How lovely! I love all those simple, robust flavours. I did a new dish the other night which I saw on a friends blog. It was tomatoes, garlic, onions, smoked paprika, all cooked up to make a sauce. Then I cracked eggs on top and baked it in the oven. So quick, so fast and so fabulous! I might do a post on it 🙂

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      • Yum. I feel like I’m just beginning to understand how our ancestors planned and prepared their food so that they would survive winter. It’s kind of basic, but we seem to have lost touch with it, and we’re missing out on so much.

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      • My original plan with my tomatoes was to put the roasted fruit in jars with some oil to preserve them, but we ended up eating that batch, so I’ll have to try again. How did you preserve yours?

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      • There are two ways that I know of. Sterilize the jars and lids, skin and chop the tomatoes, add a little salt to taste and some fresh basil. Put them inside the jars and place the sterile lids on top (don’t tighten the lids yet). Place in a large pot of warm water and cover the jar completely with about 2″ of water above the lid. Bring to boil and continue to boil for about 20 minutes. The other way was to cook the peeled tomatoes in a large pot with salt a some basil for about twenty minutes. Pour them into sterile jars and place the sterile lids on top. Tighten the lids after they have cooled somewhat. You’ll hear a pop as the lids suck in to make a seal. I used both ways and they were very good.
        Leslie

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    • 🙂 when the boy-child was little he had a couple of friends who were very fussy eaters. One “hated” tomatoes! Yet one day he left our house clutching a little bag of home-grown baby tomatoes that he was eating like sweets. Turned out he didn’t like the flavourless slices of hothouse-grown, refrigerated tomato he’d been given in the past. I realised that a lot of kids’ fussiness is that a lot of “kids food” is crap, and that adults make assumptions about children’s tastes.

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