DP Photo Challenge: “the vantage point of distance”

Autumn at Lake Waikere, Te Kauwhata, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

Lake Waikare, Te Kauwhata, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

My little escape to the Waikato is over and I’m back at my desk. Although the sun is still shining today, I’m already missing the big skies and expansive views that both dwarfed and nestled me while I was away.

State Highway 1, and the Waikato, from the Beaver Road motorway overbridge, Pokeno. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

“The end of Auckland.” State Highway 1, and south to the Waikato from the Nikau Road over-bridge. Image: Su Leslie, 2016.

It is sometimes said that “real” New Zealand begins south of the Bombay Hills, which mark the place where southern Auckland becomes northern Waikato. I spent some of the happiest of my early years in a small South Waikato town, and still get a rush of longing  when I feel I’ve left Auckland behind.

SH 26 with Mt Te Aroha in the background. Waikato, New Zealand. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

Where is everyone? Mt Te Aroha, seen from State Highway 26, at Morrinsville, Waikato, New Zealand. Image: Su Leslie, 2016.

Traffic congestion is one of the things I find most stressful in my current life. I hate the environmental impact of thousands of semi-stationery cars and I hate the waste of my time and emotional energy; trapped in my car, or planning alternative routes and workarounds. New Zealand isn’t a huge country, but there are so many places where traffic isn’t a problem — what are we doing wrong?

Waikato River flowing through Cambridge, South Waikato. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

Waikato River flowing through Cambridge, South Waikato. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

I am happiest near water, and while I’ve been a long way from the coast for the last couple of days (relatively speaking — this is New Zealand), I spent time by the Waikato River, and finally “found” Lake Waikare — which I’ve glimpsed hundreds of times from the car. Apparently it’s less than two metres deep — and sadly, quite polluted. It did look lovely from my vantage point though (1).

The Waikato River, late afternoon, with the Mercer Ferry bridge in the background. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

Late afternoon. The Waikato River at Mercer. Image: Su Leslie, 2016.

 Life is like a landscape. You live in the midst of it but can describe it only from the vantage point of distance. — Charles Lindbergh

Despite the brevity of my time away, I think I have achieved some of the clarity that Lindbergh talked about. I don’t know what the future is going to look like, but I do know that it’s easier to plan when I’m not in the middle of everything that isn’t working any more.

This post was written for the Daily Post Photo Challenge. The theme is landscape.

(1) Waikato Regional Council.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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16 thoughts on “DP Photo Challenge: “the vantage point of distance”

  1. Lovely photos. When I read this, “but I do know that it’s easier to plan when I’m not in the middle of everything that isn’t working any more.” I felt really sad. You said you felt some clarity, I hope it was good, hope-filled clarity. Best to you, lovely Su.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much Amanda. And thanks especially for re-blogging this. I love that you “get” what I’m groping for in my writing. It’s such a great feeling to connect and get that validation. Thanks again. Su.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Pingback: “the vantage point of distance” — Zimmerbitch | Surprising lives

  3. You have really showcased the rural landscape south of the Bombay well. I grew up in Auckland and have also lived in London. I don’t miss the cities and as you say the standing still traffic. I love it down here in Hastings – only a couple of minutes down the road and I am in rural Hawke’s Bay, 15 – 20 minutes to the coast and very little traffic compared to Auckland. We do have traffic jams but nothing like you experience. You should come down here sometime

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks Raewyn. Maybe there is something about putting love into images. I so enjoyed being out in the country and away from all the noise and construction and people everywhere. The people I did meet were incredibly friendly. I haven’t been to Hawkes Bay for years; it’s definitely one of the next places I need to visit. Hope you’re having a good weekend. Cheers, Su.

      Like

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