Sally D’s Mobile Photography Challenge: mind the cognitive gap

Stylised image of leaf, edited with Snapseed, Fused and Pixlr. Su Leslie, 2016

Edited with Snapseed, Stackables, Fused and Pixlr. Su Leslie, 2016

During a storm last week I noticed a single leaf stuck to my office window. I took a couple of photos; one capturing the condensation on the window as well.

I’ve been messing around with both images; trying out different filters, and double exposures in a couple of Apps (Pixlr and Fused).

Stylised image. Double-exposure; leaf on glass. Edited with Snapseed, Fused, and Pixlr. Su Leslie, 2016

Double-exposure; leaf on glass. Edited with Snapseed, Fused, and Pixlr. Su Leslie, 2016

While I’ve enjoyed playing with the various tools, I’ve also felt some frustration at the results. I know from experience that my learning always proceeds like this; initial enthusiasm followed by a period of confusion and frustration as my abilities don’t match my expectations.

Stylised image. Double-exposure; leaf on glass. Edited with Snapseed, Stackables, Fused, and Pixlr. Su Leslie, 2016

Double-exposure; leaf on glass. Edited with Snapseed, Fused, and Pixlr. Su Leslie, 2016

Generally, reflection and time away from the problem help me process what I’ve learned, figure out what what’s bothering me and, if I’m lucky, work out what to do next.

This stop-start, round-about process of learning and assimilating used to really stress me. I thought I was the only person who wasn’t “getting it” in a straightforward, linear way.

Then a few years ago I did a degree in library science and discovered there is a whole literature on how people find and process information. What I’m doing — what we’re all doing — is sense-making. Odd how naming something legitimates it!

Faint, aged-looking image of leaf on glass. Edited with Snapseed and Stackables. Su Leslie, 2016

Edited with Snapseed and Stackables. Su Leslie, 2016

As for my leaf. In the end, while I like the colours and textures of some edits, I really just prefer the pared-back shot above. What do you think?

This week for Sally D’s Mobile Photography Challenge (at Lens and Pens by Sally) the focus is on editing and processing.

PS: The post’s title references Professor Brenda Dervin’s work on sense-making — and of course the wonderful London Transport public service announcements.

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23 thoughts on “Sally D’s Mobile Photography Challenge: mind the cognitive gap

  1. I like the double exposure version most – but all have a nice vibe… and your words are so true – the wisdom layered within and how we should embrace the process more – or as you put it: “stop-start, round-about process of learning and assimilating” – which I am going through right now with a big project – whew – have a nice day

    Liked by 1 person

      • and your post first reminded me of the story about “the last leaf” – well when I read it things changed – but at first I recalled the story I learned in 6th grade –
        quick version – a little girl is ill and she is in bed for months – weary and ready to give up – she says she will die when the final autumn leaf falls.
        a guy that visits her tries to cheer her and well – as the story unfolds – a leaf gets stuck to the window – and it carries her to health – all winter the leaf is there – when she is healthy again – she finds the man who visited had painted it on the window –
        such a sweet story!

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Pingback: Sally D’ Mobile Photography Challenge: Editing and Processing (Photomontage: Heart Lands) | Lens and Pens by Sally

  3. Fascinating. Both the photo processing and the sense-making theory. I’ll have to read up on it, sounds just like the kind of thing I would love to learn more about. As for your photo processing, magnificent, really!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Your approach to learning sounds like how I learned to do genealogy research. A lot of false starts, wasted time, mistakes, bad assumptions, mixed in with enough success to keep me interested in improving.

    Lovely photos!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks Amy. You’re exactly right. I got interested in genealogy while I was studying and would probably have given up if I hadn’t discovered the literature on sense-making and realised that information-seeking isn’t linear! I stopped beating myself up, and learned that when things seem really muddled, I can tell myself I’ve simply reached “that” stage in the process. πŸ™‚

      Like

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