Six Word Saturday: from the river to the sea

Hoping for trout. Anglers in the Tongariro River, Turangi. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

Hoping for trout. Anglers in the Tongariro River, Turangi. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

Rangitikei River near Mangaweka. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

Rangitikei River near Mangaweka. Image: Su Leslie, 2016


Kai Iwi Beach, Whanganui. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

Kai Iwi Beach, Whanganui. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

Friday flowers: Kate Sheppard camellia

Close-u shot.Camellia Japonica "Kate Sheppard." Seen in the grounds of the NZ Parliament, Wellington.  Image: Su Leslie, 2016

Camellia Japonica “Kate Sheppard.” Seen in the grounds of the NZ Parliament, Wellington. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

In November 1893, New Zealand became the first country the first in the world to grant women the vote.

To commemorate the 100th anniversary of this event, women MPs planted white camellias — the flower used to symbolise support for women’s suffrage — in the grounds of Parliament House. The specific camellia planted is called “Kate Sheppard“, after the our most famous suffragette.

DP Photo Challenge, take 3: H2O what fun!

Children playing the waves breaking over seawall. Milford Beach, Auckland, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

Children playing the waves breaking over seawall. Milford Beach, Auckland, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

Water gives and takes life, but it also provides lots of opportunities for fun. “Beach culture” is a huge part of New Zealanders’ and Australians’ identity.

Visitors crowd to Bondi Beach, Sydney, NSW, Australia on a sunny afternoon. Image: Su Leslie, 2015

Sunday afternoon, Bondi Beach, NSW, Australia. Image: Su Leslie, 2015

Riding the wave.Surfer, Bondi Beach, NSW, Australia, Image: Su Leslie, 2015

Riding the wave. Surfer, Bondi Beach, NSW, Australia, Image: Su Leslie, 2015

Boat moored at West Harbour Marina, Auckland. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

Prepped and ready to go. Runabout at West Harbour Marina, Auckland. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

This post was written for the Daily Post Photo Challenge. This week’s theme is H2O.

 

Friday flip through the archives: Faces from an unexplored past

eft: Jessie Susan Harris, born 21 March 1868 Christchurch, died 13 June 1923, Hororata aged 55 right: Alice Margaret Wright, born 12 October 1872 Kaiapoi, died 10 August 1930 Washdyke photo by Eden George, Christchurch. From This photograph album was owned by Jack Thomas Frederick Baker until his death in 2003. It was previously owned by his mother Clara Elizabeth Harris (1873-1945).

Jessie Susan Harris (left), and her sister-in-law (?) Alice Margaret Wright. Photo by Eden George, Christchurch. From photograph album owned by Jack Thomas Frederick Baker, son of Clara Elizabeth Harris (1873-1945). With grateful thanks to Belinda Lansley for sending me the link to Clara’s album.

After hitting a bunch of brick walls in my own family history research, I’ve returned to looking at the Big T’s, and particularly his paternal grandmother’s family. Oh how I love New Zealand information sources. Now I just have to start writing this up …

 

Shaking the tree

eft: Jessie Susan Harris, born 21 March 1868 Christchurch, died 13 June 1923, Hororata aged 55 right: Alice Margaret Wright, born 12 October 1872 Kaiapoi, died 10 August 1930 Washdyke photo by Eden George, Christchurch. From This photograph album was owned by Jack Thomas Frederick Baker until his death in 2003. It was previously owned by his mother Clara Elizabeth Harris (1873-1945). Great grandmother, Jessie Susan Harris (left), and sister in law (?) Alice Margaret Wright. Photo by Eden George, Christchurch. From photograph album owned by Jack Thomas Frederick Baker, son of Clara Elizabeth Harris (1873-1945). With grateful thanks to Belinda Lansley for sending me the link to Clara’s album (canterburyphotography.blogspot.co.nz), and others.

We can’t help ourselves. We look at family photos and can’t help trying to find some resemblance between those we know and love, and the the faces in pictures.

The hallway in my house has become a rogues gallery of family photos and there is much pleasure to be had watching visitors scrutinize them, trying to establish who’s who. My son is regularly mistaken for his father in one photo, and an older cousin in another; while I increasingly see myself in the faces of my maternal aunts.

For family historians, photographs are the ultimate treasure. We…

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