On the imagined lives of posts, benches and other old things

There is beauty in the old and the worn and the weathered that goes far beyond the aesthetic pleasures of  haphazard and irregular colours and textures and forms.

It is the beauty of imagination.

Who hasn’t looked at a solitary, bleached and lichen-encrusted post and wondered about its function, its past, the people who hammered it into the ground, and those who leaned on it to climb a fence or open a gate.

And the weathered park bench, being progressively claimed by the surrounding garden. Who sat here to catch their breath? Or check their Facebook, send a text, write a poem or a love letter. Who read a book, planned a dinner party, solved a problem, proposed marriage or ended a relationship here?

Do you feel it too?

Posted to Lens-Artists Photo Challenge | weathered

25 thoughts on “On the imagined lives of posts, benches and other old things

  1. Love that nasturciums‘ covered bench. And ‚only‘ learned about the importance of lichen when I lived in rural UK…. there is SO much we don‘t know or learn (too) late! Nature always is a great teacher and it would be great if we people would listen more to her….. Done all the above, with the exception of FB which I was done with about 10‘ into its being, years and years back.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Both are so beautifully composed, particularly the bench and flowers. Am so glad you didn’t walk on by, but stopped to share each with us. I find the local landscape starved of such unique beauty. It’s iron benches in full sun, which can be uncomfortable in summer. 🥴

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s