Seven Nation Army

band pre gig b&w Frostbite; getting ready for their first gig. Image: Gray-Leslie family archive, 2008

The boy-child is a talented musician, and for several years played in bands. Co-ordinated through the Auckland School of Rock, the bands gave our pre-teen and others a chance to not only learn how to work together to create music, but opportunities to perform in front of (some quite large) audiences.

The focus was on writing original material, but they also performed covers. One that I particularly liked was The White Stripes song Seven Nation Army. It has a very catchy bass riff (which apparently was actually played on a guitar and digitally lowered an octave). Since the boy-child was at that stage a bass player, the riff was heard a lot around our house.

I found a recording of the kids playing this song, which reminded me just how young they were (my son was about 10 I think).

And here are The White Stripes.

Sarah at Art Expedition is hosting 30 Days, 30 Songs, and it is a great chance to stroll down some musical memory lanes. You can see her latest post here.

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38 thoughts on “Seven Nation Army

  1. This is especially heart-warming! I just learned that my niece’s 10yr old is playing the transverse flute (had to look that up – we call it Querflöte, because you hold it across your lips/face) and her brass band had a pretty impressive concert last week. It’s those children’s teacher who do all those extra hours and get them in touch with musical instruments, teachers and information….. Living in France has taught me that – in musical respects – Switzerland is wahayyyyy ahead of France and that the love for music and singing can make a huge change to those young people. Both her parents and our whole family of 4 children are big into music, singing and the rewards for personal development are huge. Love, love this!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks so much. They had such fun and learned a lot. The bands with older kids were absolutely amazing — as good as any professional musicians I’ve ever heard. All this was the brain-child of one wonderful man.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Just proves what I said about some of those amazing, involved, child- and music-loving teachers. When I was (the oldest) a child, we had a so called Social Music School with very limited funds, but it allowed me, after 2yrs (!) of studying music theory (solfège) to start playing the violin (at nearly 14yrs!) – because before it wasn’t financially possible, not even with that help of the ‘SMS’. I learned to play the cello at 50, when we could afford to buy a decent cello – and I will be eternally grateful for this early(ish) start of not only singing but MAKING music!

        Liked by 1 person

  2. This is great, Su! I loved hearing both versions. The bass and drums are so darn spot on. We have not a lick of musical talent in my family. I played guitar for a couple years in high school, but that faded quickly.

    Liked by 2 people

    • It is a great programme, and produces some amazing musicians. I think you’re right about learning to work with others; it is easier when you’re younger. All of the bands had a mentor who was a working musician, which helped keep them on track.

      Like

  3. Finally had a chance to listen/watch the video. I can’t believe how good they were and how poised! Are they still friends? Do they still play together at all? What a treasure!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Amaaaazing!!! Frostbite totally rock!!! 😄😎 I so love Seven Nation Army – my mum too btw, she has excellent taste in music 😉 – and these kids did an awesome job there on stage! I’ve always dreamed of playing the drums and joining a band but the music teacher at my school wanted me to play the violin which was so not going to happen because I wanted to rock! Now though I think it would have been lovely to learn the basics of violin. At least I taught myself to play some piano. 😊

    Liked by 1 person

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