To be a pebble

img_5214

“A rock, a large piece of rock weathers off a cliff and dives deep into a pool of gushing water. Back washed, It journeys roughly and knocks off other rocks, smashing through the waves as it loses itself in scattered pieces except for its core. That core travels far and wide, it coarsely gets ground by gravel pieces smaller than itself and bullied by boulders all of which it bears up as it withstands the pressure of a distant journey off the shore. At some point, it gets dry and it encounters mud, it gets smeared dirty but the mud doesn’t stick, the rain washes of the mud and it rolls off into the sand. It dances in the sand and dives into the bottom of the waves.

Rising like a phoenix through the ashes, it emerges polished, looking more beautiful than it did when it got edged of the cliff. It rises a pebble, smooth and sleek. Coveted by rocks starting their dive.

To be a pebble you have to run the turbulent tidal race.”
Victor Manan Nyambala, (article from LinkedIn profile)

 

Ragtag Daily Prompt | pebble

Advertisements

All-weather crossing

Footbridge at Whananaki Inlet, Northland, New Zealand. Image: Su Leslie 2019

The 400 metre bridge across the Whananaki Inlet was built by the local community so that children living on the south side of the river could attend school, which is on the north side.

Prior to the bridge, children were rowed across the inlet by one of the teachers — not much fun in bad weather. The alternative is a 12 kilometre each way road-trip.

One Word Sunday | cross

Friday flora

Impressionistic double-exposure image. Colour close-up shot of pohutukawa leaves. Image has been slightly overexposed to create a soft effect in pale greens and apricot/bronze shades. Su Leslie 2019

Pohutukawa leaves; double exposure. Image: Su Leslie 2019

Constant rain and high winds in the last couple of weeks have left many flowers looking utterly bedraggled, particularly the magnolia, camellia and rhododendron flowers I so often photograph.

The most colourful find on yesterday’s walk were the pohutukawa trees, with their mix of bright green, red and bronze leaves. Perfect for another double-exposure experiment!  This shot was a bit over-exposed, but I rather like the sof palette of greens and almost apricot shades that resulted.

When you see a chance

img_5175

Kereru (native NZ pigeon) in a cabbage tree (tī kōuka, Cordyline australis). Image: Su Leslie 2019

Photography often relies on chance — being in the right place at the right time (with the right lens).

I’ve been trying unsuccessfully for years to capture a good shot of the tui and kereru that inhabit our manuka (tea tree), kowhai and tī kōuka trees. I only captured this shot because the tī kōuka berries offer such a feast that the kereru was in no hurry to fly away.

Ragtag Daily Prompt | fortuitous

 

 

A delicate dance

Abstract colour close-up double-exposure of pale pink tulip petals. Image: Su Leslie

Tulips; double exposure. Shot with Canon 6D; 100mm macro lens. Image: Su Leslie 2019

Yesterday I discovered that my camera will shoot multiple exposures (and yeah, I am that person who doesn’t read the manual).

My bunch of tulips is rapidly turning to bare stems and a pile of petals, so I feel lucky to have this shot.