Trying to smell like dirt

Single clematis flower. Su Leslie 2019

In the spring, at the end of the day, you should smell like dirt. — Margaret Atwood

My garden is one of the reasons posting to WP Is a bit random at the moment. The Changing Seasons post IS coming — promise.

Macro Monday

Luck

Pea, mint and feta fritters with roasted asparagus. Image: Su Leslie

If I seem even more food-obsessed than usual this weekend, it’s partly because I had some sort of gastric bug earlier in the week and couldn’t eat for a couple of days; but mostly because I am feeling incredibly lucky and grateful to actually have food.

The more I read about the climate catastrophe engulfing the planet, the collapse of eco-systems and the horrendous loss of species after species, the more I wonder how much longer I can take for granted the means to produce even simple, vegetarian meals like these fritters and asparagus.

The generation I was born into the tail-end of has often been called “the lucky generation”, but I fear if we don’t all make radical changes very soon, our luck will run out.

One Word Sunday | luck

And yes, it’s not a one-word post, but the prompt for a rant on something about which I feel very strongly.

Time spent pursuing hope

All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us. — J. R. R. Tolkien

For this guy, who fishes most days off our local wharf, the decision seems to have been made.

I love fish, and quite like the idea of catching it, but I can see that for a lot of people, fishing is so much more than procuring dinner.

The charm of fishing is that it is the pursuit of what is elusive but attainable, a perpetual series of occasions for hope. — John Buchan

Shared to Debbie’s weekly quotation-inspired challenge at Travel with Intent

126 years

Camellia Japonica “Kate Sheppard.” Seen in the grounds of the NZ Parliament, Wellington. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

Yesterday was Women’s Suffrage Day in New Zealand.

On September 19th, 1893, the Governor General Lord Glasgow, signed into law a bill granting eligibility to vote to “all women who were ‘British subjects’ and aged 21 and over, including Māori, were now eligible to vote (the nationhood requirement excluded some groups, such as Chinese women).”

It made New Zealand the first country in the world to grant women the vote.

The white camellia was a symbol of women’s suffrage, and this cultivar, “Kate Sheppard” is named after one of the leaders of the suffrage movement.

Kate Sheppard (and the camellia) are also depicted on our ten dollar bill.

Posted to Friday Flowers