Secret

“A photograph is a secret about a secret. The more it tells you the less you know.” —

Diane Arbus

Images: Su Leslie 2019

Posted to Debbie’s weekly quote challenge.

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In profile

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Bronze sculpture. Artist: Terry Stringer. Wallace Arts Trust, Auckland. Image: Su Leslie

“Sculpture occupies real space like we do… you walk around it and relate to it almost as another person or another object.” — Chuck Close, artist.

One Word Sunday | profile

Detail

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“The detail is as important as the essential is. When it is inadequate, it destroys the whole outfit.” — Christian Dior

A couple of years ago, I went to an exhibition called The House of Dior: Seventy Years of Haute Couture, at the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne.

I doubt anyone could ever call me a fashionista, but I do love beautiful things — and that  exhibition was a feast of beautiful things.

“A dress is a piece of ephemeral architecture, designed to enhance the proportions of the female body.” — Christian Dior

Understandably, the gallery lighting wasn’t great for photography,  but I hope these few images can convey some of the design genius and attention to detail that has made the House of Dior famous.

Posted to Lens-Artists Photo Challenge | detail

Silence is a war crime

Street art, Whangarei, NZ. Image: Su Leslie 2019

On a recent weekend in Whangarei I was really impressed by the amount and quality of the street art that has been installed around the city. It seems that street art has moved from an underground, rebel act to one approved, organised and funded by local authorities.

Not that I’m complaining.

This was my favourite work. I wish I could find out more about it.

Detail; street art, Whangarei, NZ. Image: Su Leslie 2019

Posted to Lens Artists Photo Challenge | street art

Making space for the viewer

pliers and violin

Image: Su Leslie 2019

I think of simplicity in photography (Mies van der Rohe’s famous “less is more”) as more than the limiting of elements or a paring back of visual noise. I think it is also about creating space for the viewer to make their own story from the image.

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What do you think? How much do you like (or loath) ambiguity in an image?

Thank you to Debbie at Travel with Intent for reminding me of Ansel Adams’ statement that “There are always two people in every picture: the photographer and the viewer.”

And thanks also to Amy at The World is a Book for hosting this week’s Lens-Artists Photo Challenge | less is more.

 

New views and processes

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Cooling off. Polymer clay doll form after baking. Image: Su Leslie 2019

When we look at a piece of art, it is easy to forget that in its making, it may have gone through many stages or forms quite different to the end result.

Polymer clay doll-making is an excellent example, often beginning with a wire and aluminium foil armature around which clay is formed — sometimes for the whole body, but in many cases just for heads, hands and feet.

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Once the clay is sculpted and baked it must be cooled before the soft materials that will form the body can be attached. Image: Su Leslie 2019

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Clay, especially small pieces, are extremely fragile and need to be properly cooled before the next stage can begin. Image: Su Leslie 2019

I have made dolls in the past, but these belong to students at a recent workshop held by an artist friend. I was there solely as the photographer.

I must say though, it did rather inspire me.

Posted to the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge | something different