DP Photo Challenge: unusual

Sculpture in fibreglass of giant human baby, sitting on bench holding finger to lips. Lawrence Sellers, 'Disconnect' (2014). Seen at Brick Bay Sculpture Park. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

Lawrence Sellers, Disconnect (2014). Seen at Brick Bay Sculpture Park. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

Not sure this needs explanation given Lignum Draco‘s theme for this week’s Daily Post Photo Challenge | unusual

 

DP Photo Challenge: when is a bridge not a bridge?

Aged colour photo of sculpture called "The Mermaid" by Marijke de Goey. Consisting of a series of steel frame cubes forming a bridge over a small stream, the work is sited at Gibbs Farm Sculpture Park, Kaipara, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2015

Marijke de Goey, “The Mermaid” (1999). Sculpture located at Gibbs Farm Sculpture Park, Kaipara, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2015

…. when it’s a sculpture.

“My jewellery is sculpture for the body,
my sculptures are jewellery for the landscape.”Marijke de Goey.

For me, art can bridge the gap between the mundane and the profound; the taken-for-granted “real” world and the dreams and imaginings of our souls.

Daily Post Photo Challenge | bridge

DP Photo Challenge: evanescent, take 2

Sharing secrets? Girls at the LUX Light Festival, Wellington, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Sharing secrets? Girls at the LUX Light Festival, Wellington, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

The LUX Light Festival of Wellington has ended. Over 10 nights, thousands of visitors came to watch an ever-changing play of light and dark in a series of sculptures and installations around the city.

The cinema of the washing line. Images projected onto giant petticoat and bloomers. The Light Launder, by Raysordoll, seen at the LUX Light Festival, Wellington. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

The cinema of the washing line. Images projected onto giant petticoat and bloomers. The Light Launder, by Raysordoll, seen at the LUX Light Festival, Wellington. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Woman standing against projection of the word LUX, at the LUX Light Festival in Wellington, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

LUX. Light Festival in Wellington, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

The word LUX in lights, seen in Eva Street, Wellington during the LUX Light Festival. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

LUX. Light Festival, Wellington, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Daily Post Photo Challenge | evanescent

 

On public art, festivals and the power of community

Out on the street. Couple at the LUX Festival, Wellington, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Out on the street. Couple at the LUX Festival, Wellington, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

I spent last weekend in Wellington, visiting friends and enjoying the LUX Light Festival; a free public event that attracts thousands of people onto the streets and waterfront area  to enjoy clever, whimsical and creative light sculptures.

LUX is incredibly family-friendly; the works are easily accessible and there are performances, activities, street food, and a range of glow-in-the-dark merchandise (including ice-cream) to delight kids.

Visitors to LUX gather around 'Control, No Control' by Daniel Iregui (Iregular), Frank Kitts Park, Wellington. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Visitors to LUX gather around ‘Control, No Control’ by Daniel Iregui (Iregular), Frank Kitts Park, Wellington. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

A good night out. Girls enjoying the night market at LUX, Wellington. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

A good night out. Girls enjoying the night market at LUX, Wellington. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

On Tuesday as I waited for my flight home, news of the Manchester Arena bomb began to appear. By the time I reached Auckland, it was known that people had died, amongst them children.

With each terror attack, each mass-shooting and atrocity that occurs in the world, I struggle to comprehend how anyone can feel enough hatred and anger to knowingly kill and maim complete strangers going about their day-to-day lives.

I think of the people who rugged up and went out to enjoy street art, and of the people who dressed up and went to a pop concert; of those whose memories are of a fun night out, and those whose lives were taken or forever damaged.

Festivals, concerts, public events; these things are essential to the fabric of our communities. They build and strengthen the bonds between us though the sharing of food, music, art and fun. That they seem increasingly a target for terrorism, is worrying. If we become too afraid to go out and share in the joy and camaraderie of public events, we lose not only personal happiness, but community strength.

Yet in adversity people do come together, looking for ways to connect with our shared culture and common humanity. Manchester’s Tony Walsh has shown how art is integral to this, reading his poem, This is the Place at a vigil for the Manchester Arena victims.

Written for Sally D’s Mobile Photography Challenge at Lens and Pens by Sally.