Enjoying Manuka flowers — even without raindrops

Six Word Saturday — hosted by Debbie at Travel with Intent

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On the bright side …

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Raindrop on manuka flower. Image: Su Leslie 2019

The first six months of 2019 were the driest on record in Auckland, and now August is looking like being the wettest — with rain on 19 of 23 days, and more to come.

I’ve stopped worrying about parched soil and the water level in our tank, but I think I might need some taller gumboots (wellies, rain boots, Regenstiefel, botas de lluvia; whatever they’re called in your part of the world).

And of course raindrops on flower petals are rather pretty.

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Manuka flower. Image: Su Leslie 2019

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Manuka flower. Image: Su Leslie 2019

Friday Flowers

When you see a chance

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Kereru (native NZ pigeon) in a cabbage tree (tī kōuka, Cordyline australis). Image: Su Leslie 2019

Photography often relies on chance — being in the right place at the right time (with the right lens).

I’ve been trying unsuccessfully for years to capture a good shot of the tui and kereru that inhabit our manuka (tea tree), kowhai and tī kōuka trees. I only captured this shot because the tī kōuka berries offer such a feast that the kereru was in no hurry to fly away.

Ragtag Daily Prompt | fortuitous

 

 

More complex than a star

Common green bottle flies. Images: Su Leslie

“Our everyday world presents intellectual challenges just as daunting as those of the cosmos and the quantum, and that is where 99 per cent of scientists focus their efforts. Even the smallest insect, with its intricate structure, is far more complex than either an atom or a star.” — Martin Rees, Cosmologist and Astrophysicist

Posted to One Word Sunday | fly