Seven day black & white photo challenge: day one

Elizabeth Thompson, Moths, 2014-2017. Seen in Sarjeant on Quay Gallery, Whanganui.

My dear friend Sarah at Art Expedition has issued an open invitation to join the Seven Day Black & White Photo Challenge, and I’m taking her up on it.

The rules are:

Seven days. Seven black & white photos of your life. No people. No explanations. Challenge someone new everyday.

I’m issuing an open challenge too. Who else will join in?

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Misty morning wanderings

Stillness. Boats moored in the Upper Waitemata Harbour, seen throught early morning mist from Greenhithe Bridge. Image: Su Leslie, 2017. Edited with Snapseed.

Stillness. Boats moored in the Upper Waitemata Harbour, seen from Greenhithe Bridge. Image: Su Leslie, 2017. Edited with Snapseed.

Although not good for travellers (creating havoc at the airport), the mists that have laid themselves upon Auckland this last week have created a wonderland for walkers, photographers and dreamers.

Black and white shot of Greenhithe Bridge disappearing into the mist. Image: Su Leslie, 2017. Edited with Snapseed.

Greenhithe Bridge disappearing into the mist. Image: Su Leslie, 2017. Edited with Snapseed.

B&W shot of Greenhithe Bridge disappearing into morning mist. Image: Su Leslie, 2017. Edited with Snapseed.

If only I could see the exit! Greenhithe Bridge, misty morning. Image: Su Leslie, 2017. Edited with Snapseed.

A contribution to Sally D’s Mobile Photography Challenge at Lens and Pens by Sally.

Fun photos and hanging out with my inner child

Macro b&w shot of cut onion with bokeh. Image: Su Leslie, 2017. Edited with Snapseed.

Image: Su Leslie, 2017. Edited with Snapseed.

We don’t stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing.
— George Bernard Shaw

For me, photography is play.

I have no-one telling me what to shoot; or how and when. I don’t make money from it (although I’d like to one day). The only constraints on me are time, light and my imagination.

The shot above is pure play. Not just the messing about with an onion, a smartphone and some tinfoil (now there’s a sentence you don’t often see), but the afterwards playing — the electronic doodling with photo-editing apps.

Diane Ackerman said “play is our brain’s favorite way of learning”, while the psychologist Jean Piaget offered this advice about creativity:

If you want to be creative, stay in part a child, with the creativity and invention that characterizes children before they are deformed by adult society.
— Jean Piaget

Written for Sally D’s Mobile Photography Challenge at Lens and Pens by Sally