10 Things Tuesday: words of wisdom

photo credit: Caucas' via photopin cc

photo credit: Caucas’ via photopin cc

Time is the real currency of life. While money can be earned, spent and earned again, time cannot. It will eventually run out.  Life will end.
unknown source

kirkcaldy war memorial mod

© Su Leslie, 2013

War does not determine who is right; only who is left.
Bertrand Russell

National Archives, Kew. Su Leslie, 2013

National Archives, Kew. © Su Leslie, 2013

Life can only be understood backwards, but it must be lived forwards.
Soren Kierkegaard

Su Leslie, 2002.

© Su Leslie, 2002.

Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.
Oscar Wilde

It’s fun to have fun, but you have to know how.
Dr. Seuss

Those who shun the whimsy of things will experience rigor mortis before death.
― Tom Robbins

Bad decisions make good stories.
unknown source

Calvin: Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us.

from Bill Watterson’s brilliant Calvin and Hobbes comic strips.

Bill Watterson, Calvin and Hobbes

Life’s too short to drink bad coffee.
unknown

And finally …

Su Leslie, 2013

© Su Leslie, 2013

Good mothers let you lick the beater when they’re baking; great mothers turn the mixer off first.
greeting card

Daily Prompt: Million Dollar Question

su3

Why do I blog?

1. I’ve got a fidgety brain.  I need to write because it seems to be the only way to channel the fidgeting; to get the ideas that won’t shape themselves in my head somewhere I can see them and construct some sort of sense. It’s cerebral knitting. And yes, I do the actual kind too to stop myself grinching fabric and picking at my fingernails.

2. I’m basically sociable. I like talking to new people; having them become part of the narrative I’m constructing. And more importantly, I love sharing in other people’s stories. My mum can go for a bus ride into town and come home with eight strangers’ life stories. I used to both marvel at that and be slightly freaked out by it. But you know what? I’m becoming my mother – only I’m riding the cyber-bus.

3. I like technology. I used to keep a journal which got filled with photos and newspaper clippings, but with a blog I can have video and links to other writers’ and ideas and all sorts of cool stuff. It’s way more exciting to produce, and a much more interesting reader experience. I’ve worked as a writer/document designer and I feel really strongly that (kind of like how we eat with our eyes first) we read pages as a whole visual thing. Text is increasingly image and the more I can make those images appealing, the better.

Nuff said!

Learning to live with a little less

In Thinking it Through, Tony Watkins asks

What do you give to the person who has everything? Probably the greatest gift would be the ability to live with a little less. Far more than any consumer addition, they will treasure the ability to be free.

A single plum ripening on my plum tree.

A single plum ripening on my tree.

The quote is from a piece called “Living with a little less”, and it’s stuck in my head for the last week or so; becoming  a lens through which I see more clearly the things that are going on in my life at the moment; from de-cluttering my house, to planning meals around what’s ripe in my garden, to the way I am looking at tv advertising, politics, the environment … even trying to improve my health can be understood as living with a little less … of me.

Much of Watkins’ piece is about the process of design, suggesting that good design can be either additive—beginning with the core of form or function and adding what is needed to achieve that; or subtractive—starting with the outer limits and taking away everything that isn’t needed to achieve the design goal. (Thinking it through, p. 16)

One of the things I relish about Tony Watkins’ writing is the way ideas move so fluidly—from comment on architecture to the observation that:

The powerful philosophy of the consumer society moves us into an additive mode of thinking, but even the wealthy reach a point where they feel the need to have a garage sale.

In global terms, I am one of the wealthy—and now it’s time for my garage sale.