Layers upon layers

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Evening light, Whanganui River estuary. Image; Su Leslie 2019

This week’s Lens-Artists Photo Challenge asks for interpretations of the word layered.

Do I approach it literally with the layers of a macaron or a cafe breakfast?

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Salted caramel macaron. Not only layering of the biscuits with buttercream, but layers within the baking itself. Image: Su Leslie 2019

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Hash-browns, mushrooms, eggs; layered to look good on the plate and distribute those delicious runny yolks throughout the dish. Image: Su Leslie 2019

Or stacked container layers, gone awry in high winds?

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Containers, Wellington Harbour. High winds have wrecked havoc with the carefully constructed layers. Image: Su Leslie 2017

More broken layers?

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Reflections in the contoured glass exterior of the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery/Len Lye Centre, New Plymouth, NZ. Image: Su Leslie 2017

Or maybe layers in art?

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Detail, ‘Wave 2’ sculpture by Annette Thas. A tidal wave of discarded Barbie dolls installed at Tamarama Beach as part of Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi 2015. Image: Su Leslie

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Layer after layer of discarded Barbie dolls form a wave shape. Layers of plastic and layers of meaning. Image: Su Leslie 2015

And then there are layers created by the two-dimensional nature of photography; compressing landscapes into bands of colour and texture.

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Landscape, Canterbury, NZ. Image: Su Leslie 2019

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Tutukaka, Northland, NZ. Image: Su Leslie 2019

Not to mention layered images; double-exposures, super-impositions.

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Double-exposures; a newly discovered camera setting. Su Leslie 2019

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Photo-montage. Su Leslie 2019

Obviously, I couldn’t decide which to focus on.

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge | layered

Dawn

Image: Su Leslie 2018

“Hope begins in the dark, the stubborn hope that if you just show up and try to do the right thing, the dawn will come. You wait and watch and work: you don’t give up.” — Anne Lamott

Ragtag Daily Prompt | Dawn

Landscape

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Early morning light, Collins Park, Greenhithe, NZ. Image: Su Leslie

Landscape is my mistress– ’tis to her I look for fame. — John Constable

 

Each week Debbie at Travel with Intent offers a quotation to inspire image-sharing. This week’s quote comes from the English landscape painter, John Constable.

“But soft! What light …”

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Early morning, Luckens Reserve, West Harbour, Auckland, NZ. Su Leslie 2018

Early morning mists create wonderful soft light and I’m lucky to live in an area that still has some tall trees to silhouette against the lightening sky.

The post title comes from the famous balcony scene of Romeo and Juliet. Though of course, Romeo was using “soft” as an exclamation, and was certainly more interested in wooing Juliet than any quality of the light around them.

Lens Artist Photo Challenge | soft

DP Photo Challenge: rise/set

Sunrise shot of glowing orange skies with clouds reflected in the water of Orakei Basin, Auckland, New Zealand. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

Sunrise at Orakei Basin, Auckland, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

Photographers love the ‘golden hour’ whether it’s in the morning or evening.

I’m a morning person, so I’d expected to have more sunrise shots in my archive. Surprisingly, that’s not the case.

What I did find though, is that my morning shots tend to have fewer traces of humanity in them — whether people themselves, or our planet-covering artifacts.

Sunset at Hobsonville Point, Auckland, New Zealand, with house construction silhouetted against golden sky. Image: Su Leslie, 2018

Housing development, Hobsonville Point, Auckland, NZ. Image; Su Leslie, 2018

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Construction fencing silhouetted against the setting sun. Hobsonville Point, Auckland, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2018

Daily Post Photo Challenge | rise/set

“… a thin stream of serenity”

Corten steel and glass entrance way to cottage garden, Bason Botanic Gardens, Whanganui, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2018

Entrance to cottage garden, Bason Botanic Gardens, Whanganui, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2018

Life is anything but tranquil at the moment, and I need a gentle reminder to slow down, worry less and notice more the beauty around me.

In Whanganui a couple of weeks ago I saw this rather imposing structure at the Bason Botanic Gardens. The words on it read:

“Through the trouble of this world there still runs a thin stream of serenity for those who seek it.” — Stanley Bason

In 1966, Stanley Bason gifted his home and farm of 25 hectares to the city of Whanganui, for the “creation of a botanical reserve.” He firmly believed that as population increased and urbanisation spread, people would need beautiful, open spaces in which to relax and escape the pressures of everyday life.

His generosity and foresight have provided the people of Whanganui, and visitors, with just that.