Macro Monday

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How do we trust the structure when only a fragment is in focus? Su Leslie, 2018

The structure here is a titanium earring (a madly impractical, 1980s-excess sort of earring); incredibly strong because it is a) titanium and, b) triangular.

I know this because it’s my earring, but life is full of structures for which I have no “eye of God” perspective.

A society works because (and when) its citizens can trust the institutions and processes that form the structure of that society. Trust can only be maintained if those institutions and processes continue to perform, and do so with sufficient transparency that we are not left holding onto little but blind faith.

And when the structures start to seem wobbly or indistinct, it is our job as members of the society to stand together and do all we can to fix them.

Easier said than done, admittedly.

Neither land nor sea

Close-up shot of green-lipped mussels growing amongst the kelp and shells on rocks at Langs Beach, Northland, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Green-lipped mussels growing amongst the kelp and shells on rocks at Langs Beach, Northland, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Although almost all of the (abundantly available) green-lipped mussels we eat in New Zealand are farmed, it is not unusual to see rocks in the inter-tidal zone of many beaches covered with densely packed rows of tiny juvenile mussels. A couple of days ago at Langs Beach though, was the first time I’d seen any grow large enough to take on the distinctive green colouration of the shell from which the derive their name.

Close up shot of Green-lipped mussels growing amongst the kelp and shells on rocks at Langs Beach, Northland, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Green-lipped mussels growing amongst the kelp and shells on rocks at Langs Beach, Northland, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

I’m not sure why the wild mussels around Auckland don’t seem to grow to maturity; pollution perhaps? Or environmental damage to their ecosystems from so many other beach users.

I hope the Northland mussels have a better chance.

This is the seashore. Neither land nor sea. It’s a place that does not exist.

Alessandro Baricco

 

Written for Sally D’s Mobile Photography Challenge at Lens and Pens by Sally