Neither land nor sea

Close-up shot of green-lipped mussels growing amongst the kelp and shells on rocks at Langs Beach, Northland, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Green-lipped mussels growing amongst the kelp and shells on rocks at Langs Beach, Northland, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Although almost all of the (abundantly available) green-lipped mussels we eat in New Zealand are farmed, it is not unusual to see rocks in the inter-tidal zone of many beaches covered with densely packed rows of tiny juvenile mussels. A couple of days ago at Langs Beach though, was the first time I’d seen any grow large enough to take on the distinctive green colouration of the shell from which the derive their name.

Close up shot of Green-lipped mussels growing amongst the kelp and shells on rocks at Langs Beach, Northland, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Green-lipped mussels growing amongst the kelp and shells on rocks at Langs Beach, Northland, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

I’m not sure why the wild mussels around Auckland don’t seem to grow to maturity; pollution perhaps? Or environmental damage to their ecosystems from so many other beach users.

I hope the Northland mussels have a better chance.

This is the seashore. Neither land nor sea. It’s a place that does not exist.

Alessandro Baricco

 

Written for Sally D’s Mobile Photography Challenge at Lens and Pens by Sally

 

 

Fun photos and hanging out with my inner child

Macro b&w shot of cut onion with bokeh. Image: Su Leslie, 2017. Edited with Snapseed.

Image: Su Leslie, 2017. Edited with Snapseed.

We don’t stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing.
— George Bernard Shaw

For me, photography is play.

I have no-one telling me what to shoot; or how and when. I don’t make money from it (although I’d like to one day). The only constraints on me are time, light and my imagination.

The shot above is pure play. Not just the messing about with an onion, a smartphone and some tinfoil (now there’s a sentence you don’t often see), but the afterwards playing — the electronic doodling with photo-editing apps.

Diane Ackerman said “play is our brain’s favorite way of learning”, while the psychologist Jean Piaget offered this advice about creativity:

If you want to be creative, stay in part a child, with the creativity and invention that characterizes children before they are deformed by adult society.
— Jean Piaget

Written for Sally D’s Mobile Photography Challenge at Lens and Pens by Sally

 

Sally D’s Mobile Photography Challenge

Close up shot of Pohutukawa-like flower. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Pohutukawa-like flower: but blossoming in May? Image: Su Leslie, 2017. Edited with Snapseed and Stackables

I saw several of these plants at Westhaven Marina recently and can’t figure out whether they are out-of-season Pohutukawa, or a similar species that flowers (much) later.

Either way, they provided cheerful little bursts of red along the marina’s boardwalk.

A contribution to Sally D’s Mobile Photography Challenge at Lens and Pens by Sally.

Sally D’s Mobile Photography Challenge: macro

YOu can never have too many flowers. Double-exposure shot flowers in colour and black & white. Image: Su Leslie, 2017. Edited with Snapseed.

Flowers as symbols of hope, and of loss. Double exposure image: Su Leslie, 2017. Edited with Snapseed.

In my largely ever-green part of the world, autumn is not denoted by an increase in colour, but a gradual sense of its loss.

Sandwiched between tropical cyclones Debbie and Cook, New Zealand is experiencing a few days of sunshine. For the people of Edgecumbe in the Bay of Plenty these days are being spent salvaging what they can from their homes after the Rangitaiki River burst its banks last week and flooded the town, and preparing for the terrible possibility that the temporary repairs won’t hold in the coming storm.

Written for Sally D’s Mobile Photography Challenge at Lens and Pens by Sally.