Monochrome

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Image: Su Leslie 2019

When we think of monochrome in photography, it’s often as an alternative to colour — or even as its opposite.

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Fern frond. Image: Su Leslie 2019

We might allow sepia — with its connotations of nostalgia.

But sometimes, nature presents us with monochrome images; green leaves, a bunch of flowers, or a perfect blue day on the lake.

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Image: Su Leslie 2019

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Image: Su Leslie 2019

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Image: Su Leslie 2019

lake tarawera monochrome

Lake Tarawera, Rotorua, NZ. Image: Su Leslie 2019

I’m sure there are others.

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge | monochrome

 

Daily Post Photo Challenge: spare

Early morning training; rowing eight on the harbour, Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

No room for anything spare on a rowing shell. The non-rowing cox may even be the most important person. Rowing eight training in the Waitemata Harbour, Auckland, early morning. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

This post is a contribution to the Daily Post Photo Challenge; the theme is spare.

Home, Land and Sea

B&w image of island silhouetted in morning mist. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

Early morning, Hobsonville Point. Image: Su Leslie, 2106. Edited with Snapseed.

Home from the energy and bustle of Melbourne, I find myself in need of the moments of quiet to be found on the edge of the Waitemata Harbour that enfolds the place I call home.

Winter is almost here, bringing a dawn that is virutally monochrome — perfect for this week’s black and white theme at Sally D’s Mobile Photography Challenge.

B& W image. Boats moored off Greenhithe, early morning. Image: Su Leslie, 2016. Edited with Snapseed.

Boats moored off Greenhithe, early morning. Image: Su Leslie, 2016. Edited with Snapseed.

NZMM2016_jpgI couldn’t think of a better song to celebrate my homecoming than Home, Land and Sea, by Wellington band Trinity Roots. Singer Warren Maxwell introduces the song in this video by quite simply saying “this is about our beautiful country, Aotearoa.”

The song’s opening line, “From the tail of the fish to the top” references the Maori creation myth; that Aotearoa New Zealand was fished from the sea by the god Maui. The South Island is his waka (canoe) while the North Island is the fish itself.

Look at a map of the country — it’s not hard to visualise this. Of course, Maori told this story without benefit of written maps, let alone satellite imagery.