Just because

Seen in Te Papa Tongarewa Museum of New Zealand, Wellington. Su Leslie 2018

I am well and truly back from my little break in Wellington. The bags are unpacked and the laundry’s done. I’ve even dealt to the email backlog.

Unusually, the camera’s SD card isn’t particularly full from this trip. I think the weather may have played a part in this. Although the threatened rain held off, the wind was sufficiently robust to cause the organisers of the LUX light festival to close the event early on two evenings due to public safety concerns.

But I suspect also that Wellington has become almost a second home (albeit one where someone else makes the bed and clean towels appear as if by magic), and as such I no longer see it with eager eyes and lens.

I did however, enjoy the whimsy of the poster above (and yesterday’s Wordless Wednesday shop window).

The poster is promoting an initiative that invites visitors to the museum to “hang” their choice of work from the collection on a virtual Art Wall. Annabelle’s choice (above) is by Michael Smither, and is called big occity (1984).

Given the wealth of NZ art and the large collection at Te Papa, I’d struggle to chose just one work to add to the wall. But this work, Mangaweka, by Robin White, would definitely be a contender. I love the simplicity and clarity — and I have a sneaky fondness for the tiny village of Mangaweka in the central north island.

Regular Random: five minutes with Lt Col. Percival Fenwick (1870-1958)

Detail; model of Lt. Col. Percival Fenwick from Gallipoli: The scale of our war exhibition at Te Papa, Wellington, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Detail; model of Lt. Col. Percival Fenwick from Gallipoli: The scale of our war exhibition at Te Papa, Wellington, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

While in Wellington last week, I went to the exhibition Gallipoli: The scale of our war at the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa.

Created in partnership with Weta Workshop, the exhibition explores the WWI Gallipoli campaign through the lives and memories of eight individuals who served there. For each of the eight, a giant (2.4 times normal size) life-like model was created by Weta, showing them at a particular moment.

Lt. Colonel Percival Fenwick, who features in these photos, was a 45-year-old surgeon with the New Zealand Expeditionary Force. He was amongst the first New Zealanders to land at Gallipoli on April 25th, 1915 and remained there for two months until evacuated; sick and exhausted.

The Te Papa model shows Fenwick on May 4th 1915, leaning over Infantryman Jack Aitken of the Canterbury Infantry Regiment, in despair at not being able to save the man’s life.

Model of Lt Col Percival Fenwick. Te Papa. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Model of Lt Col Percival Fenwick. Te Papa. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Percival Fenwick survived WWI and returned to New Zealand where he continued to practice medicine. He died aged 88, in 1958.

This is a much more sombre subject than I usually post for the Five Minutes of Random (the RegularRandom challenge), but the exhibition was very moving and worthwhile.

Five Minutes of Random is a weekly photo challenge hosted by Desley Jane at Musings of a Frequently Flying Scientist.