The most beautiful moment

"The flower is the moment we live. The perfect moment." Close-up image of white apple blossom against blurred background. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

“The flower is the moment that we live … The most beautiful moment.” Image: Su Leslie, 2017

A plant has a circle. The seed becomes a plant which has a flower … it transforms into a fruit and the fruit drops. There’s another seed and the seed grows again. This is a circle. The flower is the moment that we live. The most beautiful moment of the circle. The most beautiful moment.Alex Atala, chef.

The road-bumps my family’s been experiencing lately show no signs of disappearing, and it looks as though travelling a new, more difficult road might be the new normal — at least for a while.

If I sound cryptic, then my apologies. Some stories are not really mine to share, even though I’m a character in them.

It is amazing though, how having to raise my head to new horizons also allows me to appreciate much more the simple beauty around me.

I heard the quote above on Chef’s Table last night and was moved almost to tears.

Here it is in context:

 

 

… til the cows come home

View of sunset over the Pukapuka Inlet, Mahurangi, NZ. with field of cows in the foreground. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Sun setting over the Pukapuka Inlet, seen from Mahurangi East, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

When I saw Desley’s collection of gorgeous sunset shots (Oooh, Shiiiinyyyy!) I found myself nodding in agreement with her comment about the sky as a source of distraction. I could happily watch the sun rise and set … until the cows come home.

Regular Random: five minutes with a magnolia branch

Close up shot of half-open white magnolia flower against out of focus background. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Magnolia flower. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

The magnolia tree in our garden has been slow to flower this year. For what seems like forever, tender buds have sat proudly upright, refusing to spread their velvety white petals.

Last week, a few flowers broke ranks, and by this morning it seems that many of the others have relented.

Given the brief moment of flowering, magnolias seem a perfect subject for this week’s #regularrandom.

Five Minutes of Random (the RegularRandom challenge), is hosted by Desley Jane at Musings of a Frequently Flying Scientist. 

 

A peaceful co-existence

Close-up shot of garden snail moving across a grapefruit leaf. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Snail on grapefruit leaf. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Or perhaps traverses a leaf?

I picked our remaining grapefruit this morning, and found this little creature on a leaf. Not welcome near my vegetable garden, I found it a new home amongst the ferns and Pittosporum in the farthest corner of the yard.

Regular Random: five minutes on a damp lawn

Coprinellus disseminatus (Fairies Bonnets); tiny mushrooms in a domestic lawn. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Coprinellus disseminatus (Fairies Bonnets); just popping up in the lawn. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

This is something quite magical about tiny fungus suddenly appearing in the lawn. To photograph them, I have to place myself on the cold, damp earth in which they thrive. I’m transported to a miniature world where I see the taken for granted with fresh eyes.

I’ve edited these shots to reflect that slightly other-worldly feeling.

Five Minutes of Random (the RegularRandom challenge), is hosted by Desley Jane at Musings of a Frequently Flying Scientist. 

DP Photo Challenge: the beginning of the end or the end of the beginning

The beginning of the end, or the end of the beginning. Close-up shot of Monarch butterfly chrysalis hanging from cable tie against black background. The wings are already visible as the chrysalis shell becomes translucent, indicating that emergence is imminent. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Monarch butterfly almost ready to emerge from chrysalis. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

It is a special privilege to observe nature at work. Over this past summer, the milkweed that the Big T and I planted attracted record numbers of monarch butterflies. When it became clear that most of the caterpillars were falling prey to wasps and praying manti, the Big T built a butterfly sanctuary. This meant that not only did dozens of caterpillars survive to emerge as viable butterflies, but that we had ring-side seats to one of nature’s most beautiful shows.

We watched and documented the transition from egg to caterpillar, to chrysalis, to butterfly — right up to the moment our “babies” flew away for their winter hibernation.

The Daily Post Photo Challenge | Delta