Simplicity

Reflection of a Journey‘, Torild Storvik Malmedal (2015); marble and glass. Seen at Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi, 2018. Image: Su Leslie

One Day Sunday | simplicity

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It’s in the air

Kaipara weather; rain on the way. Shot on the wharf at Shelly Beach, Kaipara. Image: Su Leslie 2019

Air and water.

As tide, wind and rain, they have immense power. A few years ago I watched very similar clouds roll down this harbour. By the time I got home on that occasion, the storm had brought a tornado which ripped through the area where I live, killing three people. Homes were flooded and people evacuated. A whole street was destroyed.

This time, we have been lucky.

Posted to One Word Sunday | power

Confusing you with someone who gives a damn

I live on a blind corner. Cars speed round it terrifyingly fast and often. Parking here is a bit of a lottery — and daft since there’s a long strait just ahead. Parking like this (if you can call it parking) is just mental. I watched in dismay this afternoon as one car after another swerved to avoid this stupidly parked vehicle; and am still shaken by how narrowly a neighbour avoided a head-on collision.

Inconsiderate driving behaviour seems to be on the increase — a sign of a wider malaise perhaps?

Posted to One Word Sunday | confusion

Hidden from the naked eye

IMG_E4071 The moment of pupation. Monarch caterpillar transforming into a chrysalis. Image: Su Leslie 2017

Macro photography truly does change the way it’s possible to see the world; focusing in on tiny details unobserved by the naked eye, and saving them as so many pixels on a computer chip.

IMG_E5246 Emerging butterfly. The fully formed Monarch butterfly breaks free. Image: Su Leslie 2017
IMG_E5376 All that remains of the Monarch’s chrysalis stage.. Image: Su Leslie 2017

From the life-cycle of a monarch caterpillar to the fine hairs on a bee’s body, what seemed hidden is revealed.

IMG_E5189 Bee and blossom. Image: Su Leslie 2017

Posted to Hidden | One Word Sunday, hosted by Debbie at Travel with Intent.

Symbolic action

Visitor to Waitangi Marae responds to the wero (challenge) by bending to pick up the taki (in this case a branch) indicating to the people of the marae that his party comes in peace. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Picking up the Taki; an indication that the visitor to this marae comes with peaceful intentions. Image; Su Leslie, 2017

Visiting a marae (Maori meeting ground) begins with a highly symbolic welcome ceremony. As part of that, a young man of the iwi (tribal group) to which the marae belongs will issue a challenge (wero) to the visiting party.

The challenge involves a symbolic demonstration of the iwi’s fighting prowess in the form of the young man and his weapon. It is asking the visitors “do you come here with peaceful intentions?”

A representative of the visiting group (usually a man) accepts the challenge by picking up the taki — a symbolic object which in many cases is a branch (think olive branch in terms of symbolism).

After that the group is welcomed onto the marae.

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Visitors, in this case a bride and groom, being welcomed onto the Te Tii Waitangi Marae at Waitangi, Northland, NZ. Su Leslie 2017

You can find out more about this powhiri (welcome process) here.

Posted to Debbie’s One Word Sunday at Travel with Intent