Confusing you with someone who gives a damn

I live on a blind corner. Cars speed round it terrifyingly fast and often. Parking here is a bit of a lottery — and daft since there’s a long strait just ahead. Parking like this (if you can call it parking) is just mental. I watched in dismay this afternoon as one car after another swerved to avoid this stupidly parked vehicle; and am still shaken by how narrowly a neighbour avoided a head-on collision.

Inconsiderate driving behaviour seems to be on the increase — a sign of a wider malaise perhaps?

Posted to One Word Sunday | confusion

The loveliest distance

child drawing

“A curved line is the loveliest distance between two points.” — unknown. Children’s art class. Image: Su Leslie 2018

Art begins with the line; sketches, paintings, even three dimensional works.

It seems to me that the urge to mark lines on a surface is quite fundamentally human. From paleolithic cave art to toddlers “redecorating” walls with Mum’s lipstick (true story — but it was my brother, honest); in all times and at all ages we seek to explore, document and indeed change our world with lines and all that flows from them.

Or as art historian Sir Kenneth Clark put it:

The difference between what we see and a sheet of white paper with a few thin lines on it is very great. Yet this abstraction is one which we seem to have adopted almost instinctively at an early stage in our development, not only in Neolithic graffiti but in early Egyptian drawings. And in spite of its abstract character, the outline is responsive to the least tremor of sensibility. 

At a cultural level, line-making helps to define humanity.

At a personal level it makes us happy — and sometimes deeply unhappy.

“Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once we grow up.” — Pablo Picasso

The joy children experience in making art can so quickly be extinguished by external — and internal — critics. “That’s no good” becomes “you’re hopeless at art”, which becomes “I’m not creative.” I actually heard a woman at an art workshop say that while introducing herself to the group.

I started writing this post for Debbie’s One Word Sunday, where this week the word is lines. Then I realised that when I talk about art, and about making art, I am also talking about happiness. So I’m adding the post also to the Lens-Artists challenge | happiness is.

Hidden from the naked eye

IMG_E4071 The moment of pupation. Monarch caterpillar transforming into a chrysalis. Image: Su Leslie 2017

Macro photography truly does change the way it’s possible to see the world; focusing in on tiny details unobserved by the naked eye, and saving them as so many pixels on a computer chip.

IMG_E5246 Emerging butterfly. The fully formed Monarch butterfly breaks free. Image: Su Leslie 2017
IMG_E5376 All that remains of the Monarch’s chrysalis stage.. Image: Su Leslie 2017

From the life-cycle of a monarch caterpillar to the fine hairs on a bee’s body, what seemed hidden is revealed.

IMG_E5189 Bee and blossom. Image: Su Leslie 2017

Posted to Hidden | One Word Sunday, hosted by Debbie at Travel with Intent.