Sometimes the journey is the best part

Ruapehu dawn. Road-trip with the boy-child. Shot of young man photographing morning mist shrouding Mt Ruapehu, New Zealand. Su Leslie, 2017

Ruapehu dawn. Road-trip with the boy-child. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

“The journey not the arrival matters”
– T.S. Eliot

Eliot’s words are particularly true when the journey is made in good company. This shot was taken last year when the boy-child and I were on a road-trip to visit family in Whanganui. A-typically for a teenager (but typical of the photographer that he is), he insisted on an extremely early start so that we could experience sunrise on the Desert Road.

Posted to Debbie’s weekly quotation-inspired challenge, at Travel with Intent.

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DP Photo Challenge: I’d rather be …

Early morning under lowering skies with low cloud around Mt Tongariro, SH1 south of Turangi, North Island, New Zealand. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

SH1 south of Turangi, North Island, New Zealand. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

… on the road. Especially the Desert Road which traverses the North Island’s volcanic central plateau. Although the road is often busy, the landscape itself is barren and desolate.

The road to Whakapapa village and ski-field, and the Chateau Tongariro, central North Island, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

The road to Whakapapa village and ski-field, and the Chateau Tongariro, central North Island, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

… or perhaps the road to the Whakapapa ski-field and a few nights of luxury at the Chateau Tongariro.

Perhaps it’s because I’m a coastal dweller, but I always find peace and a sense of well-being in the mountains.

Daily Post Photo Challenge | I’d rather be …

 

Normal service has resumed

Back to reality. Coffee, lists and bill-paying. Close-up shot of morning activity. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Back to reality. Coffee, lists and bill-paying. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

The boy-child and I have been on a little road trip to visit my father.

I had intended to keep up with the blogging world while away. But truly, we were having too much fun exploring.

The boy and the mountain. Mist-shrouded Mt Ruapehu from the Desert Road, with boy-child taking photograph. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

The boy and the mountain. Mt Ruapehu from the Desert Road. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

So apologies for my slowness in engaging with your posts and responding to comments. It’s gone on my “to-do” list.

Travel theme: close-up

Lichen found on rocks, Whakapapa Village, North Island, NZ. Photo: Su Leslie, 2014

Lichen, Whakapapa Village, North Island, NZ. Photo: Su Leslie, 2014

It’s only been two weeks since my little road trip to see my dad, but already memories are fading.

One of the highlights of the trip was the drive up to Chateau Tongariro and then up the Bruce Road to the chairlifts at the Whakapapa Ski area.

Living further north – and on the coast – I am always exhilarated by the mountains, especially the spare and rugged plant life. I loved the gorgeous lichens and heathers I found.

Heather, Mt Ruapehu, North Island, NZ. Photo: Su Leslie 2014

Heather? Or some other tough high altitude  plant. Mt Ruapehu, North Island, NZ. Photo: Su Leslie 2014

But perhaps the best “close-up” was the Chateau itself. Built in 1929, this hotel is a New Zealand landmark (I hate using the word “icon” – but it is). It was designed by New Zealand architect Herbert Hall, but modeled on the resort hotel at Lake Louise in Canada. From the 1930s until 1990, the Chateau was owned by the New Zealand government through the Tourist Hotel Corporation, which ran a number of hotels around the country. Since privatization, a new wing of 40 rooms has been added.

I’ve only stayed at the Chateau once; several months into my first job out of university I was sent to a conference there. Young, gauche and slightly out of my depth, I nevertheless had a wonderful time – feeling very grown up and sophisticated.

First glimpse: approaching the Chateau Tongariro. Photo: Su Leslie, 2014

First glimpse: approaching the Chateau Tongariro. Photo: Su Leslie, 2014

chateau

Up close. Definitely one of my “happy places.” The Chateau Tongariro, North Island, NZ. Photo: Su Leslie, 2014.

This post was written for Ailsa’s Travel Theme at Where’s my Backpack. Here are few other close-ups I’ve enjoyed:

http://politonomicsandtravel.wordpress.com/2014/05/05/weekly-travel-theme-close-up-3-05-05-14/

Close-up

http://whichwaynow101.wordpress.com/2014/05/04/travel-theme-close-up/

Travel theme: Close-up

http://exxtracts.wordpress.com/2014/05/04/travel-theme-close-up/

http://geriatrixfotogallerie.wordpress.com/2014/05/04/travel-theme-close-up/

http://smallbluegreenwords.wordpress.com/2014/05/03/travel-theme-close-up/

http://decocraftsdigicrafts.wordpress.com/2014/05/03/travel-theme-close-up/

http://witrianphotofolio.wordpress.com/2014/05/03/travel-theme-close-up/

http://pommepal.wordpress.com/2014/05/03/travel-theme-close-up/

http://shootngo.wordpress.com/2014/05/02/travel-theme-close-up/

Travel Theme: Close-Up

http://shaanthz.wordpress.com/2014/05/02/travel-theme-close-up/

http://ahecticlife.wordpress.com/2014/05/03/travel-theme-close-up/

 

 

Splash of red on an eternal blue sky

The Ratana Church, Raetihi, New Zealand. Photo: Su Leslie, 2014.

The Ratana Church, Raetihi, New Zealand. Photo: Su Leslie, 2014.

I’m not religious – nor even particularly spiritual. If asked I’d probably describe myself as a Presbyterian aethiest with catholic tendencies. I like the socialism of christianity — and I absolutely love old churches.

I encountered this Ratana church in the North Island town of Raetihi on a still, perfect morning. The Ratana Church is unique to New Zealand (although there is a branch in Australia).  It was founded  in the early twentieth century by Tahupōtiki Wiremu Rātana, a Maori prophet who had a vision instructing him to unite the Maori people in a single Christian church.

This particular church — perhaps because of its hilltop location — is an almost iconic example of Ratana architecture (sort of Romanesque revival), and has been extensively photographed so I felt as though I already knew it. I was on my way to see my dad, not quite sure where I was going and a bit pushed for time. Normally, I’d drive on by and “promise” myself that one day I’d come back and take a photograph, knowing that actually, I probably never would.

I’m not sure why that day was different; why I turned around and made a detour. The church gates were closed and it was difficult to find a good photographic vantage point on the side of a busy road, but I was happy with this shot. I don’t mind that my image is only one of thousands; it’s mine and it will always remind me of a good day; a day of stillness and joy and some reconciliation. A day of eternal blue sky.