Dreaming of blue skies and warm sand

Excursion from summer past: Kariotahi Beach, New Zealand. Su Leslie 2018

Ragtag Daily Prompt | excursion

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On the bright side …

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Raindrop on manuka flower. Image: Su Leslie 2019

The first six months of 2019 were the driest on record in Auckland, and now August is looking like being the wettest — with rain on 19 of 23 days, and more to come.

I’ve stopped worrying about parched soil and the water level in our tank, but I think I might need some taller gumboots (wellies, rain boots, Regenstiefel, botas de lluvia; whatever they’re called in your part of the world).

And of course raindrops on flower petals are rather pretty.

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Manuka flower. Image: Su Leslie 2019

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Manuka flower. Image: Su Leslie 2019

Friday Flowers

To be a pebble

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“A rock, a large piece of rock weathers off a cliff and dives deep into a pool of gushing water. Back washed, It journeys roughly and knocks off other rocks, smashing through the waves as it loses itself in scattered pieces except for its core. That core travels far and wide, it coarsely gets ground by gravel pieces smaller than itself and bullied by boulders all of which it bears up as it withstands the pressure of a distant journey off the shore. At some point, it gets dry and it encounters mud, it gets smeared dirty but the mud doesn’t stick, the rain washes of the mud and it rolls off into the sand. It dances in the sand and dives into the bottom of the waves.

Rising like a phoenix through the ashes, it emerges polished, looking more beautiful than it did when it got edged of the cliff. It rises a pebble, smooth and sleek. Coveted by rocks starting their dive.

To be a pebble you have to run the turbulent tidal race.”
Victor Manan Nyambala, (article from LinkedIn profile)

 

Ragtag Daily Prompt | pebble

All-weather crossing

Footbridge at Whananaki Inlet, Northland, New Zealand. Image: Su Leslie 2019

The 400 metre bridge across the Whananaki Inlet was built by the local community so that children living on the south side of the river could attend school, which is on the north side.

Prior to the bridge, children were rowed across the inlet by one of the teachers — not much fun in bad weather. The alternative is a 12 kilometre each way road-trip.

One Word Sunday | cross