DP Photo Challenge: rise/set

Sunrise shot of glowing orange skies with clouds reflected in the water of Orakei Basin, Auckland, New Zealand. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

Sunrise at Orakei Basin, Auckland, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

Photographers love the ‘golden hour’ whether it’s in the morning or evening.

I’m a morning person, so I’d expected to have more sunrise shots in my archive. Surprisingly, that’s not the case.

What I did find though, is that my morning shots tend to have fewer traces of humanity in them — whether people themselves, or our planet-covering artifacts.

Sunset at Hobsonville Point, Auckland, New Zealand, with house construction silhouetted against golden sky. Image: Su Leslie, 2018

Housing development, Hobsonville Point, Auckland, NZ. Image; Su Leslie, 2018

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Construction fencing silhouetted against the setting sun. Hobsonville Point, Auckland, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2018

Daily Post Photo Challenge | rise/set

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Six word (and shot) Saturday: catching the last of the light

Sunset, boardwalk at Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Sunset, Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Last days, or new beginning: an old hangar at Hobsonville Point

Shot of broken windows, and damaged masonry, disused hangar, Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

Caught in the evening light. Disused hangar, Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Image: Su Leslie, 2016. Edited with Snapseed and Stackables.

Hobsonville Point is a greenfield “community” being constructed on  a former RNZAF (Royal New Zealand Air Force) base near where I live in Auckland. Its growth is rapid, with new roads and houses springing up daily. Within the development are a number of old buildings that formed part of the base — barracks, officer housing, hangars and workshops.

One hangar is currently plastic-wrapped and obviously being refurbished. Another — shown above — is fenced off and has workmen on site. Since February, the roof has been removed, exposing the building’s steel skeleton. I assumed the hangar was being demolished, but the Big T thinks the work is too careful. Perhaps it too will be given a second lease of life.

Either way, the daily change in its profile is fascinating to watch and photograph.

Morning mist. Disused hangar, Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Image: Su Leslie, 2016. Edited with Snapseed and Stackables.

Morning mist. Disused hangar, Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Image: Su Leslie, 2016. Edited with Snapseed and Stackables.

Steel skeleton of disused hangar, Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Shot at sunset with the sun behind the building. Image: Su Leslie, 2016. Edited with Snapseed and Stackables.

Skeleton beyond the wire. The sun sets behind a disused hangar, Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Image: Su Leslie, 2016. Edited with Snapseed and Stackables.

Skeleton behind the wire at sunset. Disused hangar, Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Image: Su Leslie, 2016. Edited with Snapseed and Stackables.

Skeleton beyond the wire. The sun sets behind a disused hangar, Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Image: Su Leslie, 2016. Edited with Snapseed and Stackables.

This post was written for Sally D’s Mobile Photography Challenge at Lens and Pens by Sally.

DP photo challenge: early bird

Prisoner of the dawn. Sun rise at Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

Prisoner of the dawn? Sun rise at Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

I became a morning person somewhat unwillingly with the birth of my child. In those first days of 5am feeds and fretful napping I could not imagine there ever being a time when I could celebrate the sun rising, much less go out of my way to see it. But months and years passed; early morning crying was replaced by small hands on my face, patting me awake to request a story. Then came years of morning sports’ practices and rushing for early school buses, until finally the day arrived when 7am felt like a lie-in. Now of course, the boy-child can (and does on occasion) sleep until noon, while I stand on a motorway overbridge at 6am photographing the first blushes of colour to greet early-morning commuters.

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Before dawn, and commuters are already moving around Auckland. Photo taken from Sinden Road motorway overbridge, Hobsonville. Su Leslie, 2015.

As the closest, east-facing bit of the harbour to my home, Hobsonville Point has become my go-to place for spectacular sunrises.

This morning, I arrived just before the sun came up and a low mist still shrouded the harbour. From the yacht club I could see south down the Waitemata towards Birkenhead; where sea and sky were indistinguishable and softly grey.

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Gull in flight; Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015.

Although I could hear commuter traffic, it seemed muffled by the mist, and provided a bassline for the melody of lapping waves and the splash of a lone kayaker’s paddle.

Lone kayak on the harbour, Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

Lone kayak on the harbour, Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

Rising sun, Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015.

Rising sun, Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015.

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Rising sun, Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015.

Today is a weekday, and there is a commuter ferry from Hobsonville Point to the city, but this morning there was no-one else around and the sun came up for an audience of one.

This post was written for the Daily Post Weekly Photo Challenge.