DP Photo Challenge: focus, take 3

When Nature determines focus. misty morning, Hobsonville Point, Auckland, NZ. Upturned boats in focus against hazy backdrop of mist.Image: Su Leslie, 2017

When Nature determines focus. misty morning, Hobsonville Point, Auckland, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

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Six word (and shot) Saturday: catching the last of the light

Sunset, boardwalk at Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Sunset, Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Last days, or new beginning: an old hangar at Hobsonville Point

Shot of broken windows, and damaged masonry, disused hangar, Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

Caught in the evening light. Disused hangar, Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Image: Su Leslie, 2016. Edited with Snapseed and Stackables.

Hobsonville Point is a greenfield “community” being constructed on  a former RNZAF (Royal New Zealand Air Force) base near where I live in Auckland. Its growth is rapid, with new roads and houses springing up daily. Within the development are a number of old buildings that formed part of the base — barracks, officer housing, hangars and workshops.

One hangar is currently plastic-wrapped and obviously being refurbished. Another — shown above — is fenced off and has workmen on site. Since February, the roof has been removed, exposing the building’s steel skeleton. I assumed the hangar was being demolished, but the Big T thinks the work is too careful. Perhaps it too will be given a second lease of life.

Either way, the daily change in its profile is fascinating to watch and photograph.

Morning mist. Disused hangar, Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Image: Su Leslie, 2016. Edited with Snapseed and Stackables.

Morning mist. Disused hangar, Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Image: Su Leslie, 2016. Edited with Snapseed and Stackables.

Steel skeleton of disused hangar, Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Shot at sunset with the sun behind the building. Image: Su Leslie, 2016. Edited with Snapseed and Stackables.

Skeleton beyond the wire. The sun sets behind a disused hangar, Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Image: Su Leslie, 2016. Edited with Snapseed and Stackables.

Skeleton behind the wire at sunset. Disused hangar, Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Image: Su Leslie, 2016. Edited with Snapseed and Stackables.

Skeleton beyond the wire. The sun sets behind a disused hangar, Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Image: Su Leslie, 2016. Edited with Snapseed and Stackables.

This post was written for Sally D’s Mobile Photography Challenge at Lens and Pens by Sally.

DP photo challenge: early bird

Prisoner of the dawn. Sun rise at Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

Prisoner of the dawn? Sun rise at Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

I became a morning person somewhat unwillingly with the birth of my child. In those first days of 5am feeds and fretful napping I could not imagine there ever being a time when I could celebrate the sun rising, much less go out of my way to see it. But months and years passed; early morning crying was replaced by small hands on my face, patting me awake to request a story. Then came years of morning sports’ practices and rushing for early school buses, until finally the day arrived when 7am felt like a lie-in. Now of course, the boy-child can (and does on occasion) sleep until noon, while I stand on a motorway overbridge at 6am photographing the first blushes of colour to greet early-morning commuters.

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Before dawn, and commuters are already moving around Auckland. Photo taken from Sinden Road motorway overbridge, Hobsonville. Su Leslie, 2015.

As the closest, east-facing bit of the harbour to my home, Hobsonville Point has become my go-to place for spectacular sunrises.

This morning, I arrived just before the sun came up and a low mist still shrouded the harbour. From the yacht club I could see south down the Waitemata towards Birkenhead; where sea and sky were indistinguishable and softly grey.

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Gull in flight; Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015.

Although I could hear commuter traffic, it seemed muffled by the mist, and provided a bassline for the melody of lapping waves and the splash of a lone kayaker’s paddle.

Lone kayak on the harbour, Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

Lone kayak on the harbour, Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015

Rising sun, Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015.

Rising sun, Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015.

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Rising sun, Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015.

Today is a weekday, and there is a commuter ferry from Hobsonville Point to the city, but this morning there was no-one else around and the sun came up for an audience of one.

This post was written for the Daily Post Weekly Photo Challenge.

 

 

On nature – when it’s cold, wet and utterly beautiful

Into the mist, Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Photo: Su Leslie, 2014

Into the mist, Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Photo: Su Leslie, 2014. Shot with iPhone4, colour filter added with Pixlr Express.

In the last couple of weeks we have had some truly wonderful misty mornings and the temptation to try and capture some of the errie stillness of local parks has been too great. Last Friday I walked a little in the park at Hobsonville Point, Auckland.

Until a few years ago, Hobsonville was best known as a military base, with highly restricted access. However, the base has now closed and the land has been sold for private housing development. I can’t say I entirely agree with the wholesale scraping and levelling that has taken place to build a few thousand houses, two schools and a cafe, but at least now the public has access to the coast at this quiet little spot in the Upper Waitemata Harbour, and there does seem to be some attempt to build community spaces amidst the very high density housing.

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The children’s park, Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Photo: Su Leslie. Shot with iPhone 4, colour filter added with Pixlr Express.

One of the first things to be completed in the communal area was a children’s play area. It has a strong “nature” theme, with a number of organic, plant-like structures created amongst the more traditional play equipment like swings and climbing frames. As a mother who remembers the hours spent watching the boy-child play in parks across Europe and the Pacific, I can’t help wondering if the people who designed some of the more sculptural elements of this play area actually had kids.

Sculptural posts and distant housing, Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Photo: Su Leslie, 2014. Shot with iPhone4, colour filter added with Pixlr Express.

Sculptural posts and distant housing, Hobsonville Point, Auckland. Photo: Su Leslie, 2014. Shot with iPhone4, colour filter added with Pixlr Express.

Sally’s theme this week at Lens and Pens by Sally is “nature.” For me, mid-winter in temperate Auckland, the most noticeable feature in the natural world lately has been the weather, and in particular the morning mists.