A change of scenery

Mt Ruapehu, North Island, NZ. Image: Su Leslie 2019

I live on an isthmus; about 700 metres from the sea at high tide. I can’t see the water from my house, but it’s impossible to travel far in any direction and NOT encounter the Waitemata or Manukau harbours which define and enfold Auckland.

In this, I know I’m extremely fortunate.

Well, except for a couple of weeks ago when three large off-shore earthquakes had many New Zealanders scrambling to evacuate their homes and head for high ground, while the rest of us spent a tense day listening to the news and checking our emergency supply kits.

But tsunami risk aside, living in Auckland means that “the beach” is the backdrop to everyday life. So when I need a change of scenery, my favourite place is the mountains in the central plateau of New Zealand’s north island.

The road to Whakapapa village and ski-field, and the Chateau Tongariro, central North Island, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

The road to Whakapapa village and ski-field, and the Chateau Tongariro, central North Island, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

I’m sure part of my longing is tied to memory. My first visit to the area was to attend a conference held at the Chateau Tongariro — a wonderfully grand hotel nestled in the foothills of Mt Ruapehu.

The Chateau Tongariro, built in 1929 to encourage tourists to visit the newly opened Tongariro National Park. Image: Su Leslie, 2016

The central plateau, more accurately the North Island volcanic plateau includes three active volcanoes; Mount Tongariro, Mount Ngauruhoe, and Mount Ruapehu and the Rangipo Desert. Not that Auckland doesn’t have volcanoes too, but ours are much smaller, never snow-covered and tend to erupt only once. Mt Tongariro last erupted in 2012; Mt Ruapehu in 2007.

Mt Ngauruhoe, Central Plateau, NZ. Image: Su Leslie

Rangipo Desert, Central Plateau, NZ. Image: Su Leslie

And just as the macro landscape is vastly different to my “normal”, the flora is too.

Close up shot of small green/red plant growing around the snowline at Mt Ruapehu, New Zealand. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Alpine flora, Mt Ruapehu, New Zealand. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Close up shot of four-leafed alpine plant growing around snow line on Mt Ruapehu, NZ. Leaves bright green with white, fuzzy edges. Two of the leaves are beginning to brown. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Alpine flora, Mt Ruapehu, New Zealand. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Close up shot of spreading yellow-green succulent-type plants growing amongst white moss. Seen at the snow line on Mt Ruapehu, NZ. Image: Su leslie, 2017

Alpine flora, Mt Ruapehu, New Zealand. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Small white flower clusters mixed in with green mosses seen on Mt Ruapehu, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Alpine flora, Mt Ruapehu, New Zealand. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Although I appreciate the benefits of living in a city, the noise and bustle and sheer number of people and cars exhausts me. I’m not sure I could live in the shadow of the mountains, but it brings me joy to spend time there.

First light on Mt Ruapehu, Central Plateau, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Morning light on Mt Ruapehu, Central Plateau, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Early morning under lowering skies with low cloud around Mt Tongariro, SH1 south of Turangi, North Island, New Zealand. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

The Desert Road, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Storm clouds, Central Plateau, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

First light Central Plateau, NZ. Image: Su Leslie, 2017

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge | A change of scenery

63 thoughts on “A change of scenery

  1. Isthmus…that is such a lovely word. And I live on a peninsula. We have no mountains here–Florida is so flat. Circle me in with you and Jo–I am always up for a road trip! Your photos are fabulous.

    Liked by 3 people

    • I can totally understand your love of the mountains. I’d kind of like it if ours weren’t quite such active volcanoes, but I did choose to live in NZ and they don’t call it the Shaky Isles for nothing.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I’m interested that you say you couldn’t live in the shadow of the mountains. Nothing brings me greater joy, and i miss the Pyrenees every day. I think it’s the awe they inspire in me, and oddly enough, the fact that they put me in my place!

    Liked by 2 people

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