Travel Photo, no. 9

Brian at Bushboy’s World invited me to join him and other bloggers posting a travel photo a day for ten days.

The deal is I also invite someone else each day to join in, and have them ping-back to my post.

I know how busy many of your blog schedules are, so I am always a bit loathe to nominate people.

But … many of you have travelled much more than me and have wonderful archives to dip in to …and I do really enjoy seeing the world through your eyes.

So if there is anyone in our blogging whanau who hasn’t already been shoulder-tapped and would like to join in … please do.

Travel Photo, no. 8

Brian at Bushboy’s World invited me to join him and other bloggers posting a travel photo a day for ten days.

The deal is I also invite someone else each day to join in, and have them ping-back to my post.

I know how busy many of your blog schedules are, so I am always a bit loathe to nominate people.

But … many of you have travelled much more than me and have wonderful archives to dip in to …and I do really enjoy seeing the world through your eyes.

So if there is anyone in our blogging whanau who hasn’t already been shoulder-tapped and would like to join in … please do.

Seeing double

photographer hosier lane

“There are always two people in every picture: the photographer and the viewer.” – Ansel Adams.  Image: Su Leslie 2019

Some things feel like they should always come in twos — like biscuits, and scoops of ice-cream. Though with (regular) hindsight, maybe having two eyes but only one stomach is a problem.

two macaronplumes dessert

Apparently, one of the earliest versions of  the saying “two’s company, three’s a crowd” dates back to 1678. John Ray wrote in his collection English Proverbs “One’s too few, three too many.”

One becomes two: shadows and reflections.

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge | seeing double

Love is a doing word

su and tom second pic_cleaned up1

Motherhood; day 1. Image: Leslie-Gray family archive, 1998.

 The boy-child was not a model baby. Although delivered full-term, he weighed barely 2.5kg at birth, and we struggled hugely in his first few months with feeding difficulties and erratic sleeping patterns.

I’m not entirely sure what I expected of motherhood, but certainly not the exhaustion, guilt, fear, loneliness and utter helplessness I experienced. I had told clients I’d probably be back to work after about eight weeks. In reality, as eight weeks became twelve, I still considered it a good day if I managed to get both the baby and I dressed and out of the house.

The post-natal depression with which I was diagnosed lasted for years. Long after the boy-child’s sleeping ceased to be a problem, I still experienced the same sick, clenched stomach if he did cry out in the night.

There is a lot I just don’t remember about my son’s first year — and I certainly wasn’t up to taking lots of photos, or keeping a “Milestones” book as many of the other new mothers I knew did.

When I think back on that time, what I do remember is the music. The soundtrack of my son’s babyhood may well be the best bit, and there are so many songs I could choose from that time.

But I’ve always loved the opening line of this song, and I think that although it isn’t about motherhood, it speaks brilliantly to the essence of a mother’s love.

Love, love is a verb

Love is a doing word

Massive Attack, Teardrop

Sarah at Art Expedition is hosting 30 Days, 30 Songs for the month of June. You can see her latest post here.

Why not join in — as Tracy at Reflections of an Untidy Mind so brilliantly puts it “casual players welcome.”

Like father, like son … not really

IMG_2170

A younger, and much muckier, boy-child. Image: Su Leslie 2006

I really had to go searching for a shot of the boy-child in any sort of state that could be described as grubby. He’s always been an outdoorsy sort, but as a skateboarder, prefers paved urban street to muddy fields.

His father on the other hand ….

IMG_8641

Never afraid to get grubby in the pursuit of a good bike ride. The “I’m so tough, I kick sand in my own face” shot. Image: Su Leslie 2016

Posted to the RagTag Daily Prompt | grubby

DP Photo Challenge: smile

Shot of greeting card showing the Three Wise Men. Caption says "well... I thought a book token was a very sensible idea."

Greeting card; given by a friend so many years ago that book tokens were still a “thing.”

Smiles have been in rather short supply lately for family ZimmerBitch.

The boy-child is learning some hard lessons on his path to becoming an adult; dealing with work and study and a raft of annoyances and disappointments that have left him exhausted and glum.

Anxiety about our son’s welfare, coupled with stress around the decisions we need to make about our own future, have left even the normally cheerful Big T struggling to smile.

And as if the emotional grims weren’t enough, ALL the family cars have recently suffered some sort of ‘needs-money-spent’ problem.

Then yesterday the glass panel on our kitchen range-hood decided to part company with the rest of the device, leaving every surface in the kitchen twinkling under a sea of broken glass. And leaving us shopping for a new range-hood.

But still, when I went into the office this morning and saw the “Three Wise Men” card, I smiled. Partly because I think it’s genuinely funny, but mostly because it’s a reminder of a friendship that stretches back almost 40 years, and a friend who cheers me up when I need it.

I need it now.

Daily Post Photo Challenge | smile

Springing back: on changing seasons and getting sick

Captured out walking between rain showers. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015. Shot with iPhone4, edited with Snapseed.

Captured out walking between rain showers. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015. Shot with iPhone4, edited with Snapseed.

Having remained healthy throughout a particularly cold and wet winter, it is annoying (and really uncomfortable) to finally succumb to a spring flu.

The boy-child toppled first; but with the resilience of youth was better within 24 hours. I thought I’d followed the same path, but seem to be fighting (more or less successfully) a rear-guard action against a second assault.

It is the Big T who has been hardest hit, with aches, fever, sore throat and a wretched cough. He’s remarkably immune to “man-flu”, so I know it’s bad when he stays in bed and cancels meetings. It’s on days like this I’m grateful I work from home and that my office is only across the landing from our bedroom.

So between sickness and persistent rain showers, I haven’t been out much, and this week’s photos were taken on a fairly short, but brisk, walk around the neighbourhood at the weekend. They’ve been edited a little — mainly to darken the background — and I think quite accurately reflect the quiet, slightly somber mood of our household at the moment.

photo-2

Captured out walking between rain showers. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015. Shot with iPhone4, edited with Snapseed.

A trick of the light; this flower was on the same shrub as the others, but shot from a different angle, was captured in a different light. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015. Shot with iPhone4, edited with Snapseed and Pixlr Express.

A trick of the light; this flower was on the same shrub as the others, but shot from a different angle, was captured in a different light. Photo: Su Leslie, 2015. Shot with iPhone4, edited with Snapseed and Pixlr Express.

This post was written for Sally D’s Mobile Photography Challenge at Lens and Pens by Sally. This week’s theme is nature.

Travel theme: feet

" an act or instance of placing close together or side by side, esp. for comparison or contrast.

How far he has travelled. Photo: Su Leslie, 2014

This photo was taken eighteen months ago, just before my son turned 16. I had been rummaging in the “box of memories” and found his first proper shoes. The boy-child could hardly believe he had ever fitted into something so small.

Since then, his feet have grown more and he has traveled even farther — physically and emotionally. He has graduated high school, vacationed with us in Europe, taken his first solo holiday and found a job he loves. He’s also looking at university courses for next year and is starting to think about buying a car.

So I guess this photo is a metaphor for my son’s journey to adulthood; a journey that he is increasingly taking in huge strides, and in a direction of his own choosing. I miss the little boy who wore those tiny buckled shoes, but I am incredibly proud of the man he is becoming.

This post was written for Ailsa’s Travel Theme at Where’s My Backpack.